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Who is Responsible and What are They Responsible For? Contextual Features Matter in Judgments of Responsibility and Helping

Who is Responsible and What are They Responsible For? Contextual Features Matter in Judgments of... A contribution of Marjanovic and colleagues’ work (2011) is its investigation of helping in the context of natural disasters—a distinctive context in which to study judgments of responsibility and helping. Unlike many other contexts, it is atypical to regard victims of natural disasters as the ultimate cause of their own plight. Furthermore, when thinking about responsibility for a disaster's fallout, people may be likely to focus on groups rather than individuals. In other words, when making judgments of responsibility for natural disasters, people's judgments are likely shaped by what they are assigning blame for (i.e., onset or offset responsibility) and what kind of targets are to blame (individuals or collectives). This commentary discusses how these contextual features may impact attributional reasoning. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy Wiley

Who is Responsible and What are They Responsible For? Contextual Features Matter in Judgments of Responsibility and Helping

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2012 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
ISSN
1529-7489
eISSN
1530-2415
DOI
10.1111/j.1530-2415.2012.01288.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A contribution of Marjanovic and colleagues’ work (2011) is its investigation of helping in the context of natural disasters—a distinctive context in which to study judgments of responsibility and helping. Unlike many other contexts, it is atypical to regard victims of natural disasters as the ultimate cause of their own plight. Furthermore, when thinking about responsibility for a disaster's fallout, people may be likely to focus on groups rather than individuals. In other words, when making judgments of responsibility for natural disasters, people's judgments are likely shaped by what they are assigning blame for (i.e., onset or offset responsibility) and what kind of targets are to blame (individuals or collectives). This commentary discusses how these contextual features may impact attributional reasoning.

Journal

Analyses of Social Issues & Public PolicyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2012

References