What Would You Sacrifice? Access to Top Management and the Work–life Balance

What Would You Sacrifice? Access to Top Management and the Work–life Balance This article is based on a current research, combining quantitative (human resources figures and statistics) and qualitative data (60 interviews with career managers, top managers and high potential talents, both men and women), conducted in a major French utility company on the subject of diversity and more specifically on the issue of women's access to top management positions. The main purpose of this research is to understand the difficulties women may encounter in the course of their occupational career linked to organizational aspects, including the ‘glass ceiling’ processes, informal norms related to management positions (such as time and mobility constraints) and social and cultural representations attached to leadership. The other perspective of this research focuses on the different strategies women and men build either to conform to the organizational norms or bypass them. The issue of work–life balance are therefore addressed both from a corporate/organizational standpoint and an individual and family perspective. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gender, Work & Organisation Wiley

What Would You Sacrifice? Access to Top Management and the Work–life Balance

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 2009 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0968-6673
eISSN
1468-0432
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-0432.2007.00354.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is based on a current research, combining quantitative (human resources figures and statistics) and qualitative data (60 interviews with career managers, top managers and high potential talents, both men and women), conducted in a major French utility company on the subject of diversity and more specifically on the issue of women's access to top management positions. The main purpose of this research is to understand the difficulties women may encounter in the course of their occupational career linked to organizational aspects, including the ‘glass ceiling’ processes, informal norms related to management positions (such as time and mobility constraints) and social and cultural representations attached to leadership. The other perspective of this research focuses on the different strategies women and men build either to conform to the organizational norms or bypass them. The issue of work–life balance are therefore addressed both from a corporate/organizational standpoint and an individual and family perspective.

Journal

Gender, Work & OrganisationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2009

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

  • La gestion des cadres à haut potentiel
    Falcoz, Christophe
  • Une anthropologie des managers
    Flamand, Nicolas

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