What is orthographic processing skill and how does it relate to word identification in reading?

What is orthographic processing skill and how does it relate to word identification in reading? The role of orthographic processing skill (OPS) in reading has aroused the interest of many developmental researchers. Despite observations by Vellutino that current measures of OPS primarily are indicators of reading (and spelling) achievement, OPS commonly is distinguished from both reading achievement and phonological skills. An analysis of the reading literature indicates that there is no theory in which OPS meaningfully plays a role as an independent skill or causal factor in reading acquisition. Rather, OPS indexes fluent word identification and spelling knowledge, and there is no evidence to refute the hypothesis that its development relies heavily on phonological processes. Results of correlational studies and reader group comparisons (a) cannot inform about on‐line processes and (b) may be parsimoniously explained in terms of phonological skills, reading experience, unmeasured language abilities and methodological factors, without implying that OPS is an aetiologically separable skill. Future research would profit from the investigation in experimental studies of the nature and development of orthographic representations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Research in Reading Wiley

What is orthographic processing skill and how does it relate to word identification in reading?

Journal of Research in Reading, Volume 29 (4) – Nov 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/what-is-orthographic-processing-skill-and-how-does-it-relate-to-word-U50SF1e0w0
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0141-0423
eISSN
1467-9817
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-9817.2006.00315.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The role of orthographic processing skill (OPS) in reading has aroused the interest of many developmental researchers. Despite observations by Vellutino that current measures of OPS primarily are indicators of reading (and spelling) achievement, OPS commonly is distinguished from both reading achievement and phonological skills. An analysis of the reading literature indicates that there is no theory in which OPS meaningfully plays a role as an independent skill or causal factor in reading acquisition. Rather, OPS indexes fluent word identification and spelling knowledge, and there is no evidence to refute the hypothesis that its development relies heavily on phonological processes. Results of correlational studies and reader group comparisons (a) cannot inform about on‐line processes and (b) may be parsimoniously explained in terms of phonological skills, reading experience, unmeasured language abilities and methodological factors, without implying that OPS is an aetiologically separable skill. Future research would profit from the investigation in experimental studies of the nature and development of orthographic representations.

Journal

Journal of Research in ReadingWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2006

References

  • What comes after phonological awareness? Using lexical experts to investigate orthographic processes in reading
    Andrews, Andrews; Scarratt, Scarratt
  • Poor saccadic control correlates with dyslexia
    Biscaldi, Biscaldi; Gezeck, Gezeck; Stuhr, Stuhr
  • Leisure time reading and orthographic processes in word recognition among Norwegian third‐ and fourth‐grade students
    Braten, Braten; Lie, Lie; Andreassen, Andreassen; Olaussen, Olaussen
  • Is there a causal link from phonological awareness to success in learning to read?
    Castles, Castles; Coltheart, Coltheart
  • Subtypes of developmental dyslexia and lexical acquisition
    Castles, Castles; Holmes, Holmes
  • Converging evidence for the concept of orthographic processing
    Cunningham, Cunningham; Perry, Perry; Stanovich, Stanovich
  • The relationship between phonological awareness and the development of orthographic representations
    Dixon, Dixon; Stuart, Stuart; Masterson, Masterson
  • A plea for purity
    Hogben, Hogben
  • Skilled reading and orthographic processing
    Holmes, Holmes
  • Dyslexia and a transient/magnocellular pathway deficit
    Lovegrove, Lovegrove
  • On the bases of two subtypes of development dyslexia
    Manis, Manis; Seidenberg, Seidenberg; Doi, Doi; McBride Chang, McBride Chang; Petersen, Petersen
  • Developmental dyslexia
    Seymour, Seymour; MacGregor, MacGregor
  • Phonological recoding and self‐teaching
    Share, Share

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off