What imposters risk at work: Exploring imposter phenomenon, stress coping, and job outcomes

What imposters risk at work: Exploring imposter phenomenon, stress coping, and job outcomes Imposter phenomenon (IP) has traditionally been linked to indicators of psychological well‐being with fewer studies examining the impact on work outcomes. Using conservation of resources (COR) theory, we examined how imposter phenomenon as a personal demand contributed to emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction among a sample of university faculty (N = 310). Our results suggest that individuals who experience high levels of IP deplete critical resources needed to avoid psychological strain in part because of their use of avoidant coping strategies, and in how their experience of emotional exhaustion contributes to low job satisfaction. That is, avoidant coping partially mediated the imposter–emotional exhaustion relationship, and the imposter–job satisfaction relationship is fully and serially mediated through avoidant coping and emotional exhaustion. To help combat imposter feelings and enhance job outcomes, we suggest the use of learning and development interventions as active coping approaches (e.g., training, coaching, and mentoring) geared at correcting how imposters attribute success and failures, increase social support, and normalize the imposter experience. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Development Quarterly Wiley

What imposters risk at work: Exploring imposter phenomenon, stress coping, and job outcomes

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1044-8004
eISSN
1532-1096
D.O.I.
10.1002/hrdq.21304
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Imposter phenomenon (IP) has traditionally been linked to indicators of psychological well‐being with fewer studies examining the impact on work outcomes. Using conservation of resources (COR) theory, we examined how imposter phenomenon as a personal demand contributed to emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction among a sample of university faculty (N = 310). Our results suggest that individuals who experience high levels of IP deplete critical resources needed to avoid psychological strain in part because of their use of avoidant coping strategies, and in how their experience of emotional exhaustion contributes to low job satisfaction. That is, avoidant coping partially mediated the imposter–emotional exhaustion relationship, and the imposter–job satisfaction relationship is fully and serially mediated through avoidant coping and emotional exhaustion. To help combat imposter feelings and enhance job outcomes, we suggest the use of learning and development interventions as active coping approaches (e.g., training, coaching, and mentoring) geared at correcting how imposters attribute success and failures, increase social support, and normalize the imposter experience.

Journal

Human Resource Development QuarterlyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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