What do students actually do on an internal medicine clerkship? A log diary study

What do students actually do on an internal medicine clerkship? A log diary study Background There are limited data on the amount of time students spend on teaching and learning while on internal medicine clerkships, and existing data suggest a wide international variation. Community‐based teaching of internal medicine is now widespread; but its strengths and weaknesses compared to traditional hospital based teaching are still unclear. Aim To determine the proportion of time students spend on different activities on an internal medicine clerkship, and to determine whether this differs in general practice and in hospital. In addition we aimed to determine students’ views on the educational value and enjoyment of various activities. Methods Prospective completion of log diaries recording student activities. Each student was asked to complete the diary for two separate weeks of their internal medicine clerkship: one week of general practice‐based teaching and one week of hospital‐based teaching. Results The response rate was 68% (88/130). Students spent approximately 5·5 h per day on teaching and learning activities in both environments, with more time (50 min vs. 30 min, P=0·007) on unsupervised interaction with patients in hospital than in general practice, and more time (53 min vs. 21 min, P < 0·001) undergoing assessment in general practice than in hospital. Standard deviations were wide, demonstrating the heterogeneous nature of the data. Students perceived supervised interaction with patients and teaching by doctors as the most educational activities in both environments, but found it even more educationally valuable and enjoyable in general practice than in hospital (mean score for educational value: 4·27 in general practice, 3·88 in hospital, P=0·048; mean score for enjoyment 4·13 in general practice, 3·66 in hospital, P=0·03). Conclusions Students greatly value interactions with patients, perceiving these as both educational and enjoyable. Curriculum planners must continue to place patient‐based learning at the centre of undergraduate medical education. The heterogeneity of the data suggests that individual students have very different experiences, despite apparently similar timetables. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Medical Education Wiley

What do students actually do on an internal medicine clerkship? A log diary study

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/what-do-students-actually-do-on-an-internal-medicine-clerkship-a-log-USrBUYiJZ0
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0308-0110
eISSN
1365-2923
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2923.2001.01053.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background There are limited data on the amount of time students spend on teaching and learning while on internal medicine clerkships, and existing data suggest a wide international variation. Community‐based teaching of internal medicine is now widespread; but its strengths and weaknesses compared to traditional hospital based teaching are still unclear. Aim To determine the proportion of time students spend on different activities on an internal medicine clerkship, and to determine whether this differs in general practice and in hospital. In addition we aimed to determine students’ views on the educational value and enjoyment of various activities. Methods Prospective completion of log diaries recording student activities. Each student was asked to complete the diary for two separate weeks of their internal medicine clerkship: one week of general practice‐based teaching and one week of hospital‐based teaching. Results The response rate was 68% (88/130). Students spent approximately 5·5 h per day on teaching and learning activities in both environments, with more time (50 min vs. 30 min, P=0·007) on unsupervised interaction with patients in hospital than in general practice, and more time (53 min vs. 21 min, P < 0·001) undergoing assessment in general practice than in hospital. Standard deviations were wide, demonstrating the heterogeneous nature of the data. Students perceived supervised interaction with patients and teaching by doctors as the most educational activities in both environments, but found it even more educationally valuable and enjoyable in general practice than in hospital (mean score for educational value: 4·27 in general practice, 3·88 in hospital, P=0·048; mean score for enjoyment 4·13 in general practice, 3·66 in hospital, P=0·03). Conclusions Students greatly value interactions with patients, perceiving these as both educational and enjoyable. Curriculum planners must continue to place patient‐based learning at the centre of undergraduate medical education. The heterogeneity of the data suggests that individual students have very different experiences, despite apparently similar timetables.

Journal

Medical EducationWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2001

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off