What Do Real Population Dynamics Tell Us About Minimum Viable Population Sizes?

What Do Real Population Dynamics Tell Us About Minimum Viable Population Sizes? Centre for Population Biology Imperial College at Silwood Park Ascot, Berks, SL5 7PY, England There is no single “magic” population size that guarantees the persistence of animal populations (e.g., Shaffer 1981; Gilpin & Soule 1986; Soule and Simberloff 1986; hnde 1988; Simberloff 1988). This is partly because extinction is probabilistic and partly because each minimum viable population (MVP) must be estimated separately, after considering characteristics of the population and environment under scrutiny. MVP estimates are then used to design and manage reserves for focal species. This approach is exemplified by studies reported in the Special Section on Population Viability Analysis in the March 1990 issue of Conservation Biology The papers by Murphy et al. (1990) and Menges (1990) emphasize aspects of the dynamic nature of the spatial distributions of populations, and they stress the need to conserve what could be termed Minimum Dynamic Areas, often in reserve networks. Yet in the few remote and relatively unmodified regions of the world where reserve design is still possible on a large scale (e.g., parts of Amazonia), many focal species (e.g., large forest eagles) are too poorly known to calculate their MVPs and Minimum Dynamic Areas. Land use decisions will be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

What Do Real Population Dynamics Tell Us About Minimum Viable Population Sizes?

Conservation Biology, Volume 4 (3) – Sep 1, 1990

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1990 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1523-1739.1990.tb00295.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Centre for Population Biology Imperial College at Silwood Park Ascot, Berks, SL5 7PY, England There is no single “magic” population size that guarantees the persistence of animal populations (e.g., Shaffer 1981; Gilpin & Soule 1986; Soule and Simberloff 1986; hnde 1988; Simberloff 1988). This is partly because extinction is probabilistic and partly because each minimum viable population (MVP) must be estimated separately, after considering characteristics of the population and environment under scrutiny. MVP estimates are then used to design and manage reserves for focal species. This approach is exemplified by studies reported in the Special Section on Population Viability Analysis in the March 1990 issue of Conservation Biology The papers by Murphy et al. (1990) and Menges (1990) emphasize aspects of the dynamic nature of the spatial distributions of populations, and they stress the need to conserve what could be termed Minimum Dynamic Areas, often in reserve networks. Yet in the few remote and relatively unmodified regions of the world where reserve design is still possible on a large scale (e.g., parts of Amazonia), many focal species (e.g., large forest eagles) are too poorly known to calculate their MVPs and Minimum Dynamic Areas. Land use decisions will be

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1990

References

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