Web accessibility

Web accessibility An overview of the key topics faced by disability services providers with citations to noteworthy cases, statutes, regulations, and additional sources.OverviewAll pages of an institution's website must be accessibility to individuals with disabilities. Review recent Office for Civil Rights findings on web accessibility.Key Rulings❏ A complainant claimed to OCR he was unable to register through Mt. Hood Community College's website for a summer 2014 online class because the website was inaccessible to him as a screen‐reader user and didn't offer any alternative way to register for the class. The college signed a resolution agreeing to take steps to resolve the complaint, including ensuring that all online programs, services, and activities are accessible to individuals with disabilities. Letter to: Mt. Hood Community College, No. 10142224 (OCR 09/11/14).❏ OCR performed a compliance review of accessibility of the University of Cincinnati's websites, focusing on the needs of individuals with sensory impairments who may require assistive technology to access the sites. OCR's review identified several compliance issues, including a lack of a formal process to ensure compliance with policies; an absence of policies or procedures concerning the purchase of technology and/or its compatibility with assistive technology; and multiple technical deficiencies in website accessibility, including images lacking alternative text equivalents. Letter to: University of Cincinnati, No. 15‐13‐6001 (OCR 12/18/14).❏ A complainant alleged that Bay Mills Community College discriminated by failing to make all its webpages accessible to individuals with certain kinds of disabilities, including visual, print, physical, and hearing impairments. The agency used an accessibility tool as well to conduct a preliminary review of some of the pages listed in the complaint. Its review raised some red flags, including a lack of skip navigation, keyboard controls that did not allow equivalent ease of use, and lack of meaningful alternate text. Before OCR could complete its investigation and issue a finding, the institution entered into a resolution agreement to resolve the issues identified. Letter to: Bay Mills Community College, No. 15‐16‐2187 (OCR 10/14/16).❏ A complainant claimed that Michigan Virtual University discriminated because some of its webpages were not accessible to individuals with disabilities like visual impairments. OCR conducted a preliminary accessibility review of those pages, resulting in various accessibility alerts, which pointed to issues with the skip navigation, keyboard controls, nontrivial graphics' alternate text, link labeling, and visual contrast. Even though OCR's preliminary investigation, while pointing to areas of concern, did not determine that sufficient evidence existed that a violation of Title II had occurred, the institution offered to resolve the complaint voluntarily. The agreement's provisions included that it would ensure that the institution's online content is fully accessible by established accessibility standards and that the institution would designate at least one individual as a web accessibility coordinator and provide that person with the resources and authority needed to implement the accessibility policy. Letter to: Michigan Virtual University, No. 15‐16‐2146 (OCR 10/13/16).What You Should KnowWeb‐based campus services such as registration must be accessible to students with disabilities.An institution's website must be accessible to individuals with sensory impairments who require assistive technology to access web content.Websites should include features such as skip navigation, keyboard controls that allow equivalent ease of use, and meaningful alternate text.Institutions must establish policies and procedures for ensuring web accessibility. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disability Compliance for Higher Education Wiley

Web accessibility

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/wiley/web-accessibility-cgPJLwp0zb
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1086-1335
eISSN
1943-8001
D.O.I.
10.1002/dhe.30412
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An overview of the key topics faced by disability services providers with citations to noteworthy cases, statutes, regulations, and additional sources.OverviewAll pages of an institution's website must be accessibility to individuals with disabilities. Review recent Office for Civil Rights findings on web accessibility.Key Rulings❏ A complainant claimed to OCR he was unable to register through Mt. Hood Community College's website for a summer 2014 online class because the website was inaccessible to him as a screen‐reader user and didn't offer any alternative way to register for the class. The college signed a resolution agreeing to take steps to resolve the complaint, including ensuring that all online programs, services, and activities are accessible to individuals with disabilities. Letter to: Mt. Hood Community College, No. 10142224 (OCR 09/11/14).❏ OCR performed a compliance review of accessibility of the University of Cincinnati's websites, focusing on the needs of individuals with sensory impairments who may require assistive technology to access the sites. OCR's review identified several compliance issues, including a lack of a formal process to ensure compliance with policies; an absence of policies or procedures concerning the purchase of technology and/or its compatibility with assistive technology; and multiple technical deficiencies in website accessibility, including images lacking alternative text equivalents. Letter to: University of Cincinnati, No. 15‐13‐6001 (OCR 12/18/14).❏ A complainant alleged that Bay Mills Community College discriminated by failing to make all its webpages accessible to individuals with certain kinds of disabilities, including visual, print, physical, and hearing impairments. The agency used an accessibility tool as well to conduct a preliminary review of some of the pages listed in the complaint. Its review raised some red flags, including a lack of skip navigation, keyboard controls that did not allow equivalent ease of use, and lack of meaningful alternate text. Before OCR could complete its investigation and issue a finding, the institution entered into a resolution agreement to resolve the issues identified. Letter to: Bay Mills Community College, No. 15‐16‐2187 (OCR 10/14/16).❏ A complainant claimed that Michigan Virtual University discriminated because some of its webpages were not accessible to individuals with disabilities like visual impairments. OCR conducted a preliminary accessibility review of those pages, resulting in various accessibility alerts, which pointed to issues with the skip navigation, keyboard controls, nontrivial graphics' alternate text, link labeling, and visual contrast. Even though OCR's preliminary investigation, while pointing to areas of concern, did not determine that sufficient evidence existed that a violation of Title II had occurred, the institution offered to resolve the complaint voluntarily. The agreement's provisions included that it would ensure that the institution's online content is fully accessible by established accessibility standards and that the institution would designate at least one individual as a web accessibility coordinator and provide that person with the resources and authority needed to implement the accessibility policy. Letter to: Michigan Virtual University, No. 15‐16‐2146 (OCR 10/13/16).What You Should KnowWeb‐based campus services such as registration must be accessible to students with disabilities.An institution's website must be accessible to individuals with sensory impairments who require assistive technology to access web content.Websites should include features such as skip navigation, keyboard controls that allow equivalent ease of use, and meaningful alternate text.Institutions must establish policies and procedures for ensuring web accessibility.

Journal

Disability Compliance for Higher EducationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off