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Wearables in epilepsy and Parkinson's disease—A focus group study

Wearables in epilepsy and Parkinson's disease—A focus group study INTRODUCTIONEpilepsy and Parkinson's disease (PD) are common neurological diseases that cause significant disability and have a substantial negative impact on quality of life. The diversity of epileptic seizures and their unpredictable occurrence as well as the documented difficulty to remember seizures constitute major challenges in monitoring disease activity in epilepsy. In PD, the main challenge is to characterize medication‐related symptom fluctuations. Regular recurrent assessments at outpatient visits capture only snapshots of the situation. The usefulness of patient diaries is also limited by low compliance and recall bias.Wearable sensors, such as accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers integrated in garments or accessories, known as wearables, have been increasingly introduced in research and clinical practice. They could potentially fill a need for improved outpatient evaluation in epilepsy and PD. Promising results have been demonstrated for accelerometry‐based sensors in detection of generalized tonic‐clonic (convulsive) seizures in epilepsy and for assessment of gait, balance, and motor fluctuations in PD. However, before successful implementation, reliability and validity of wearables need to be established and acceptability and usability explored both from the patients’ and the health professionals’ perspective.Persons with epilepsy (PwE) have reported that wristband, “intelligent clothes,” and scalp electrodes for seizure registration were perceived as acceptable http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Neurologica Scandinavica Wiley

Wearables in epilepsy and Parkinson's disease—A focus group study

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References (26)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0001-6314
eISSN
1600-0404
DOI
10.1111/ane.12798
pmid
28714112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONEpilepsy and Parkinson's disease (PD) are common neurological diseases that cause significant disability and have a substantial negative impact on quality of life. The diversity of epileptic seizures and their unpredictable occurrence as well as the documented difficulty to remember seizures constitute major challenges in monitoring disease activity in epilepsy. In PD, the main challenge is to characterize medication‐related symptom fluctuations. Regular recurrent assessments at outpatient visits capture only snapshots of the situation. The usefulness of patient diaries is also limited by low compliance and recall bias.Wearable sensors, such as accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers integrated in garments or accessories, known as wearables, have been increasingly introduced in research and clinical practice. They could potentially fill a need for improved outpatient evaluation in epilepsy and PD. Promising results have been demonstrated for accelerometry‐based sensors in detection of generalized tonic‐clonic (convulsive) seizures in epilepsy and for assessment of gait, balance, and motor fluctuations in PD. However, before successful implementation, reliability and validity of wearables need to be established and acceptability and usability explored both from the patients’ and the health professionals’ perspective.Persons with epilepsy (PwE) have reported that wristband, “intelligent clothes,” and scalp electrodes for seizure registration were perceived as acceptable

Journal

Acta Neurologica ScandinavicaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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