Vitamin E intake and risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Vitamin E intake and risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We therefore examined prospectively whether individuals who regularly use supplements of the antioxidant vitamins E and C have a lower risk of ALS than nonusers. The study population comprised 957,740 individuals 30 years of age or older participating in the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study II. Information on vitamin use was collected at time of recruitment in 1982; participants then were followed up for ALS deaths from 1989 through 1998 via linkage with the National Death Index. During the follow‐up, we documented 525 deaths from ALS. Regular use of vitamin E supplements was associated with a lower risk of dying of ALS. The age‐ and smoking‐adjusted relative risk was 0.99 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69–1.41) among occasional users, 0.59 (95% CI, 0.36–0.96) in regular users for less than 10 years, and 0.38 (95% CI, 0.16–0.92) in regular users for 10 years or more as compared with nonusers of vitamin E (p for trend = 0.004). In contrast, no significant associations were found for use of vitamin C or multivitamins. These results suggest that vitamin E supplementation could have a role in ALS prevention. Ann Neurol 2004 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 American Neurological Association
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
DOI
10.1002/ana.20316
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We therefore examined prospectively whether individuals who regularly use supplements of the antioxidant vitamins E and C have a lower risk of ALS than nonusers. The study population comprised 957,740 individuals 30 years of age or older participating in the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study II. Information on vitamin use was collected at time of recruitment in 1982; participants then were followed up for ALS deaths from 1989 through 1998 via linkage with the National Death Index. During the follow‐up, we documented 525 deaths from ALS. Regular use of vitamin E supplements was associated with a lower risk of dying of ALS. The age‐ and smoking‐adjusted relative risk was 0.99 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.69–1.41) among occasional users, 0.59 (95% CI, 0.36–0.96) in regular users for less than 10 years, and 0.38 (95% CI, 0.16–0.92) in regular users for 10 years or more as compared with nonusers of vitamin E (p for trend = 0.004). In contrast, no significant associations were found for use of vitamin C or multivitamins. These results suggest that vitamin E supplementation could have a role in ALS prevention. Ann Neurol 2004

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2005

References

  • Oxidative stress and motor neurone disease
    Cookson, Cookson; Shaw, Shaw
  • Mitochondrial enzyme activity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: implications for the role of mitochondria in neuronal cell death
    Borthwick, Borthwick; Johnson, Johnson; Ince, Ince
  • The efficacy of trientine or ascorbate alone compared to that of the combined treatment with these two agents in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model mice
    Nagano, Nagano; Fujii, Fujii; Yamamoto, Yamamoto
  • Increased 3‐nitrotyrosine in both sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
    Beal, Beal; Ferrante, Ferrante; Browne, Browne
  • Morphological evidence for lipid peroxidation and protein glycoxidation in spinal cords from sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients
    Shibata, Shibata; Nagai, Nagai; Uchida, Uchida
  • ALS‐linked Cu/Zn‐SOD mutation increases vulnerability of motor neurons to excitotoxicity by a mechanism involving increased oxidative stress and perturbed calcium homeostasis
    Kruman, Kruman; Pedersen, Pedersen; Springer, Springer; Mattson, Mattson

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