Visible and invisible effects of hurricanes on forest ecosystems: an international review

Visible and invisible effects of hurricanes on forest ecosystems: an international review Abstract Hurricanes have visible and invisible effects on forests. The visible effects are dramatic, noticeable over the short‐term and relatively well documented in the literature. Invisible effects are less understood as they require well‐focused research both in the short‐ and long‐term time scales. This review of the literature on hurricane effects focuses on the Neotropics and the temperate zone of North America. The material is organized according to a heuristic model that distinguishes between immediate effects (0 to 3 years), immediate responses (0 to 20 years), trajectories of responses (0 to 100 years) and long‐term legacies (>100 years). It is suggested that the ecological role of hurricanes involves six principal effects: 1. they change the ecological space available to organisms; 2. they set organisms in motion; 3. they increase the heterogeneity of the landscape and the variability in ecosystem processes; 4. they rejuvenate the landscape and its ecosystems and redirect succession; 5. they shape forest structure, influence their species composition and diversity and regulate their function; and 6. they induce evolutionary change through natural selection and ecological creativity through self‐organization. A new approach to hurricane research will study hurricanes at the same scale at which they operate (i.e., across latitudes and longitudes and over disturbed and undisturbed landscapes). This research will require networks of observation platforms located along expected hurricane paths to facilitate forest structure and functioning observations across gradients of hurricane frequency and intensity. This research will also require use of remote sensing and automated wireless technology, hardened to survive hurricane‐strength winds and floods to assure real time measurements of the characteristics of hurricanes and ecosystem responses. No progress will be forthcoming in the understanding of hurricane effects if we do not learn to quantify objectively the energy dissipation of hurricanes on the full grid of affected forests as the hurricane passes over a landscape. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Austral Ecology Wiley

Visible and invisible effects of hurricanes on forest ecosystems: an international review

Austral Ecology, Volume 33 (4) – Jun 1, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/visible-and-invisible-effects-of-hurricanes-on-forest-ecosystems-an-wVk8iOQsTk
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Journal compilation © 2008 Ecological Society of Australia. No claim to original US government works
ISSN
1442-9985
eISSN
1442-9993
DOI
10.1111/j.1442-9993.2008.01894.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Hurricanes have visible and invisible effects on forests. The visible effects are dramatic, noticeable over the short‐term and relatively well documented in the literature. Invisible effects are less understood as they require well‐focused research both in the short‐ and long‐term time scales. This review of the literature on hurricane effects focuses on the Neotropics and the temperate zone of North America. The material is organized according to a heuristic model that distinguishes between immediate effects (0 to 3 years), immediate responses (0 to 20 years), trajectories of responses (0 to 100 years) and long‐term legacies (>100 years). It is suggested that the ecological role of hurricanes involves six principal effects: 1. they change the ecological space available to organisms; 2. they set organisms in motion; 3. they increase the heterogeneity of the landscape and the variability in ecosystem processes; 4. they rejuvenate the landscape and its ecosystems and redirect succession; 5. they shape forest structure, influence their species composition and diversity and regulate their function; and 6. they induce evolutionary change through natural selection and ecological creativity through self‐organization. A new approach to hurricane research will study hurricanes at the same scale at which they operate (i.e., across latitudes and longitudes and over disturbed and undisturbed landscapes). This research will require networks of observation platforms located along expected hurricane paths to facilitate forest structure and functioning observations across gradients of hurricane frequency and intensity. This research will also require use of remote sensing and automated wireless technology, hardened to survive hurricane‐strength winds and floods to assure real time measurements of the characteristics of hurricanes and ecosystem responses. No progress will be forthcoming in the understanding of hurricane effects if we do not learn to quantify objectively the energy dissipation of hurricanes on the full grid of affected forests as the hurricane passes over a landscape.

Journal

Austral EcologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2008

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off