Vibration syndrome in industry: Dermatological viewpoint

Vibration syndrome in industry: Dermatological viewpoint Long‐term use of hand‐held vibratory tools has been implicated in the development of a clinical condition known under several names including occupational Raynaud's phenomenon, vibration‐induced white finger (VWF) disease, and “dead” or “wax” finger. The syndrome is characterized in its early stages by tingling, numbness, or blanching of the finger tips provoked usually by exposure to cold temperatures; later these symptoms may extend to the base of all of the digits on both hands. As vibration exposure continues, the attacks become more frequent and cause manual impairment and social disability. This complex of VWF and associated arterial and related complications is now termed vibration syndrome (VS). Although epidemiologic studies indicate that large percentages of the population of workers at greatest risk are affected, the acceptance of VS as an industrial disease is only recent. This paper reviews some of the salient features of VS from the point of view of the dermatologist, since he may be the first health professional to see patients with this syndrome. Terminology, risk factors, preventative measures, therapy, and occupational guidelines are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Industrial Medicine Wiley

Vibration syndrome in industry: Dermatological viewpoint

American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Volume 8 (4‐5) – Jan 1, 1985

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0271-3586
eISSN
1097-0274
DOI
10.1002/ajim.4700080423
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Long‐term use of hand‐held vibratory tools has been implicated in the development of a clinical condition known under several names including occupational Raynaud's phenomenon, vibration‐induced white finger (VWF) disease, and “dead” or “wax” finger. The syndrome is characterized in its early stages by tingling, numbness, or blanching of the finger tips provoked usually by exposure to cold temperatures; later these symptoms may extend to the base of all of the digits on both hands. As vibration exposure continues, the attacks become more frequent and cause manual impairment and social disability. This complex of VWF and associated arterial and related complications is now termed vibration syndrome (VS). Although epidemiologic studies indicate that large percentages of the population of workers at greatest risk are affected, the acceptance of VS as an industrial disease is only recent. This paper reviews some of the salient features of VS from the point of view of the dermatologist, since he may be the first health professional to see patients with this syndrome. Terminology, risk factors, preventative measures, therapy, and occupational guidelines are discussed.

Journal

American Journal of Industrial MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1985

References

  • Acrosclerosis associated with vibration: An electron microscopic study
    Hashimoto, Hashimoto; Craig, Craig
  • Vibration: Good or bad?
    Ryan, Ryan
  • Ketanserin in the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon
    Seibold, Seibold; Jageneau, Jageneau

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