Vertebrate head induction by anterior primitive endoderm

Vertebrate head induction by anterior primitive endoderm In vertebrates the antero‐posterior organization of the embryonic body axis is thought to result from the activity of two separate centers, the head organizer and the trunk organizer, as operationally defined by Spemann in the 1920s. Current molecular studies have supported the existence of a trunk organizer activity while the presence of a distinct head inducing center has remained elusive. Mainly based on analyses of headless mutants in mice, it has been proposed that the anterior axial mesoderm plays a determining role in head induction. Recent gain‐ and loss‐of‐function studies in various organisms, however, provide compelling evidence that a largely ignored region, the anterior primitive endoderm, specifies rostral identity. In this review we discuss the emerging concept that the anterior primitive endoderm, rather than the prechordal plate mesoderm, induces head development in the vertebrate embryo. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioEssays Wiley

Vertebrate head induction by anterior primitive endoderm

BioEssays, Volume 19 (10) – Oct 1, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Cambridge University Press
ISSN
0265-9247
eISSN
1521-1878
DOI
10.1002/bies.950191005
pmid
9363679
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In vertebrates the antero‐posterior organization of the embryonic body axis is thought to result from the activity of two separate centers, the head organizer and the trunk organizer, as operationally defined by Spemann in the 1920s. Current molecular studies have supported the existence of a trunk organizer activity while the presence of a distinct head inducing center has remained elusive. Mainly based on analyses of headless mutants in mice, it has been proposed that the anterior axial mesoderm plays a determining role in head induction. Recent gain‐ and loss‐of‐function studies in various organisms, however, provide compelling evidence that a largely ignored region, the anterior primitive endoderm, specifies rostral identity. In this review we discuss the emerging concept that the anterior primitive endoderm, rather than the prechordal plate mesoderm, induces head development in the vertebrate embryo.

Journal

BioEssaysWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1997

References

  • Transcription factors and head formation in vertebrates
    Bally‐Cuif, Bally‐Cuif; Boncinelli, Boncinelli
  • Analysis of Dishevelled signalling pathways during Xenopus development
    Sokol, Sokol
  • Activation of Siamois by the Wnt pathway
    Brannon, Brannon; Kimelman, Kimelman
  • Synergistic effects of Vg1 and Wnt signals in the specification of dorsal mesoderm and endoderm
    Cui, Cui; Tian, Tian; Christian, Christian
  • Ectodermal patterning in vertebrate embryos
    Sasai, Sasai; de Robertis, de Robertis
  • Patterning activities of vertebrate hedgehog proteins in the developing eye and brain
    Ekker, Ekker
  • Anterior primitive endoderm may be responsible for patterning the anterior neural plate in the mouse embryo
    Thomas, Thomas; Beddington, Beddington

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