Value priorities and social desirability: Much substance, some style

Value priorities and social desirability: Much substance, some style Associations of value priorities with socially desirable responding (SD) might be due to a stylistic bias that distorts self‐reported value ratings or to a substantive relationship between valued goals and needs. We hypothesize that, as a stylistic bias, SD would increase (a) the importance people attribute to values in general and (b) lead people to match own value ratings to those of importance in their social environment. As a substantive variable, SD would correlate positively with value types that emphasize social harmony (conformity, security, benevolence, tradition) and negatively with value types that challenge social conventions and harmony (hedonism, stimulation, self‐direction, achievement, power). In separate studies, 207 Israeli adults and 131 Finnish social work students completed the Marlow—Crowne SD scale and a value survey. Both studies supported the substantive hypotheses. There was weak evidence for the first stylistic hypothesis, but none for the second. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Social Psychology Wiley

Value priorities and social desirability: Much substance, some style

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/value-priorities-and-social-desirability-much-substance-some-style-RVttSW5JIV
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1997 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0144-6665
eISSN
2044-8309
DOI
10.1111/j.2044-8309.1997.tb01115.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Associations of value priorities with socially desirable responding (SD) might be due to a stylistic bias that distorts self‐reported value ratings or to a substantive relationship between valued goals and needs. We hypothesize that, as a stylistic bias, SD would increase (a) the importance people attribute to values in general and (b) lead people to match own value ratings to those of importance in their social environment. As a substantive variable, SD would correlate positively with value types that emphasize social harmony (conformity, security, benevolence, tradition) and negatively with value types that challenge social conventions and harmony (hedonism, stimulation, self‐direction, achievement, power). In separate studies, 207 Israeli adults and 131 Finnish social work students completed the Marlow—Crowne SD scale and a value survey. Both studies supported the substantive hypotheses. There was weak evidence for the first stylistic hypothesis, but none for the second.

Journal

British Journal of Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off