V: THE MOVEMENTS OF THE EYES DURING READING

V: THE MOVEMENTS OF THE EYES DURING READING V. THE MOVEMENTS OF THE EYES DURING KEADIKG BY HOLCEKEHLERS (Copenhagen). By looking closely at the eyes of a reading person it becomes evident that they do not move gradually along the lines, but in small nystagniiform dextrad jerks in order, when the line is finished, to move back to the left side (of the reader) and commence the next line in the same way. There is much reason for presuming that the eyes during reading merely see during the quiet stationary intervals between the jerks and not whilst the eyes perform the rapid jerking inovements. This theory is for instance corroborated by the circumstance that the top line of a page can be read without the background of the room, which is visible above the book, showing the slightest sign of specious sinistrad movement, which naturally should be the case i f the eyes could see all the time during their dextrad movements along the lines. Therefore, the movements of the eyes during reading should probably be identified with the rapid phase of nystagmus, but in this connection this question shall not be discussed in detail. s7 The perpetual jerk-like movements of the eyes during ordinary steady http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Ophthalmologica Wiley

V: THE MOVEMENTS OF THE EYES DURING READING

Acta Ophthalmologica, Volume 14 (1‐2) – Mar 1, 1936

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1936 Institution Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica
ISSN
1755-375X
eISSN
1755-3768
DOI
10.1111/j.1755-3768.1936.tb07306.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

V. THE MOVEMENTS OF THE EYES DURING KEADIKG BY HOLCEKEHLERS (Copenhagen). By looking closely at the eyes of a reading person it becomes evident that they do not move gradually along the lines, but in small nystagniiform dextrad jerks in order, when the line is finished, to move back to the left side (of the reader) and commence the next line in the same way. There is much reason for presuming that the eyes during reading merely see during the quiet stationary intervals between the jerks and not whilst the eyes perform the rapid jerking inovements. This theory is for instance corroborated by the circumstance that the top line of a page can be read without the background of the room, which is visible above the book, showing the slightest sign of specious sinistrad movement, which naturally should be the case i f the eyes could see all the time during their dextrad movements along the lines. Therefore, the movements of the eyes during reading should probably be identified with the rapid phase of nystagmus, but in this connection this question shall not be discussed in detail. s7 The perpetual jerk-like movements of the eyes during ordinary steady

Journal

Acta OphthalmologicaWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1936

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