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Using the Program Logic Model to Evaluate ¡Cuídate!: A Sexual Health Program for Latino Adolescents in a School‐Based Health Center

Using the Program Logic Model to Evaluate ¡Cuídate!: A Sexual Health Program for Latino... ABSTRACT Background Addressing the disparities in pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates for Latino youth in the United States requires an evidence‐based approach. Although randomized controlled trials for sexual risk reduction interventions have shown promise in improving short‐term outcomes, program sustainability has not been extensively examined in school settings where teens spend time. Latina teen pregnancy rates are nearly twice the national average. Adolescents comprise only 17% of the U.S. population, yet they account for 50% of STIs. ¡Cuídate! is a high‐impact sexual health group program endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that has not been replicated in a real‐world setting. Aims The program logic model (PLM) was used as the systematic approach to plan, implement, and evaluate a sustainable model of sexual health group programing (¡Cuídate!) in a U.S. high school with a large Latino student population. Methods The PLM provided the framework for the evaluation of outputs, outcome, and impact. A multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance was used as the means to evaluate the participant outcomes immediately postprogram and at 8–12 weeks. Results ¡Cuídate! was executed within an existing school structure and time constraints, below cost projections, and with high participant retention (95.8%). Three cohorts (N = 24) of female teens demonstrated significant increases in STI or HIV knowledge, self‐efficacy, and intention to use condoms (p < .01). Condom use increased postprogram. No participants initiated sexual behavior, nor were there any reported pregnancies or STIs. Conclusions An evidence‐based intervention previously tested in randomized controlled trials can be sustained in a school‐based health center with similar results of efficacy. Linking Evidence to Action Our success served as a platform for a sustainable program. We continue to extend the impact of the program by delivering ¡Cuídate! in the school setting using a community health worker. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png World Views on Evidence-Based Nursing Wiley

Using the Program Logic Model to Evaluate ¡Cuídate!: A Sexual Health Program for Latino Adolescents in a School‐Based Health Center

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International
ISSN
1545-102X
eISSN
1741-6787
DOI
10.1111/wvn.12110
pmid
26422189
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Background Addressing the disparities in pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates for Latino youth in the United States requires an evidence‐based approach. Although randomized controlled trials for sexual risk reduction interventions have shown promise in improving short‐term outcomes, program sustainability has not been extensively examined in school settings where teens spend time. Latina teen pregnancy rates are nearly twice the national average. Adolescents comprise only 17% of the U.S. population, yet they account for 50% of STIs. ¡Cuídate! is a high‐impact sexual health group program endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that has not been replicated in a real‐world setting. Aims The program logic model (PLM) was used as the systematic approach to plan, implement, and evaluate a sustainable model of sexual health group programing (¡Cuídate!) in a U.S. high school with a large Latino student population. Methods The PLM provided the framework for the evaluation of outputs, outcome, and impact. A multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance was used as the means to evaluate the participant outcomes immediately postprogram and at 8–12 weeks. Results ¡Cuídate! was executed within an existing school structure and time constraints, below cost projections, and with high participant retention (95.8%). Three cohorts (N = 24) of female teens demonstrated significant increases in STI or HIV knowledge, self‐efficacy, and intention to use condoms (p < .01). Condom use increased postprogram. No participants initiated sexual behavior, nor were there any reported pregnancies or STIs. Conclusions An evidence‐based intervention previously tested in randomized controlled trials can be sustained in a school‐based health center with similar results of efficacy. Linking Evidence to Action Our success served as a platform for a sustainable program. We continue to extend the impact of the program by delivering ¡Cuídate! in the school setting using a community health worker.

Journal

World Views on Evidence-Based NursingWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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