Using the Internet for psychological research: Personality testing on the World Wide Web

Using the Internet for psychological research: Personality testing on the World Wide Web The Internet is increasingly being used as a medium for psychological research. To assess the validity of such efforts, an electronic version of Gangestad & Snyder's (1985) revised self‐monitoring questionnaire was placed at a site on the World Wide Web. In all, 963 responses were obtained through the Internet and these were compared with those from a group of 224 undergraduates who completed a paper‐and‐pencil version. Comparison of model fit indices obtained through confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the Internet‐mediated version had similar psychometric properties to its conventional equivalent and compared favourably as a measure of self‐monitoring. Reasons for possible superiority of Internet data are discussed. Results support the notion that Web‐based personality assessment is possible, but stringent validation of test instruments is urged. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Psychology Wiley

Using the Internet for psychological research: Personality testing on the World Wide Web

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1999 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0007-1269
eISSN
2044-8295
DOI
10.1348/000712699161189
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Internet is increasingly being used as a medium for psychological research. To assess the validity of such efforts, an electronic version of Gangestad & Snyder's (1985) revised self‐monitoring questionnaire was placed at a site on the World Wide Web. In all, 963 responses were obtained through the Internet and these were compared with those from a group of 224 undergraduates who completed a paper‐and‐pencil version. Comparison of model fit indices obtained through confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the Internet‐mediated version had similar psychometric properties to its conventional equivalent and compared favourably as a measure of self‐monitoring. Reasons for possible superiority of Internet data are discussed. Results support the notion that Web‐based personality assessment is possible, but stringent validation of test instruments is urged.

Journal

British Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1999

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