Using remote sensing to predict grape phenolics and colour at harvest in a Cabernet Sauvignon vineyard: Timing observations against vine phenology and optimising image resolution

Using remote sensing to predict grape phenolics and colour at harvest in a Cabernet Sauvignon... Optical remote sensing can provide a synoptic view of grapevine photosynthetically‐active biomass over entire vineyards both rapidly and cost‐effectively. Such output offers viticulturists and winemakers a management tool of enormous potential with red grape varieties, especially if canopy architecture (defined in this way) can be linked to production of phenolics and colour in ripe grapes. Accordingly, this paper describes such associations for a Cabernet Sauvignon vineyard in Australia's cool‐climate Coonawarra region. A link is established between physical descriptors of grapevine canopies (derived from remotely‐sensed images), and subsequent measurements of grape phenolics and colour. High‐resolution images were acquired on three occasions during each of two consecutive growing seasons and post‐processed to a range of on‐ground resolutions. The strength of correlation between those images and berry properties (both total phenolics, and colour levels at harvest), varied according to spatial resolution and vine phenology at the time of imaging. An image resolution corresponding approximately to row spacing resulted in the strongest correlations between berry constituents and image‐based data on all occasions. Referenced to grapevine phenology, correlations were initially weak (insignificant) at bud‐burst, reached maximum strength at veraison, then diminished somewhat as grapes ripened. Prospects for applying such remotely‐sensed imagery (at an appropriate resolution and timing), to predict berry phenolics and colour at harvest, are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research Wiley

Using remote sensing to predict grape phenolics and colour at harvest in a Cabernet Sauvignon vineyard: Timing observations against vine phenology and optimising image resolution

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/using-remote-sensing-to-predict-grape-phenolics-and-colour-at-harvest-8iXSRsL4oI
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1322-7130
eISSN
1755-0238
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1755-0238.2004.tb00007.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Optical remote sensing can provide a synoptic view of grapevine photosynthetically‐active biomass over entire vineyards both rapidly and cost‐effectively. Such output offers viticulturists and winemakers a management tool of enormous potential with red grape varieties, especially if canopy architecture (defined in this way) can be linked to production of phenolics and colour in ripe grapes. Accordingly, this paper describes such associations for a Cabernet Sauvignon vineyard in Australia's cool‐climate Coonawarra region. A link is established between physical descriptors of grapevine canopies (derived from remotely‐sensed images), and subsequent measurements of grape phenolics and colour. High‐resolution images were acquired on three occasions during each of two consecutive growing seasons and post‐processed to a range of on‐ground resolutions. The strength of correlation between those images and berry properties (both total phenolics, and colour levels at harvest), varied according to spatial resolution and vine phenology at the time of imaging. An image resolution corresponding approximately to row spacing resulted in the strongest correlations between berry constituents and image‐based data on all occasions. Referenced to grapevine phenology, correlations were initially weak (insignificant) at bud‐burst, reached maximum strength at veraison, then diminished somewhat as grapes ripened. Prospects for applying such remotely‐sensed imagery (at an appropriate resolution and timing), to predict berry phenolics and colour at harvest, are discussed.

Journal

Australian Journal of Grape and Wine ResearchWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off