Using niche‐based GIS modeling to test geographic predictions of competitive exclusion and competitive release in South American pocket mice

Using niche‐based GIS modeling to test geographic predictions of competitive exclusion and... Geographic studies addressing the role of competition in determining species’ macrodistributions have been limited by only simple or subjective means of identifying regions of suitable habitat. Now, ecological‐niche models of species’ potential distributions present a possible approach to testing for the geographic patterns predicted under competitive exclusion and competitive release. Previously, we modeled the potential distributions of two spiny pocket mice (Heteromys australis and H. anomalus) in northwestern South America using specimen localities, environmental data, and the Genetic Algorithm for Rule‐Set Prediction (GARP). Here we superimpose the models to examine known distributional records in areas of potential sympatry between the two species, thus testing the geographic predictions of competitive exclusion. In addition, we examine environmental characteristics of known localities, testing for data consistent with competitive release. Areas of potential sympatry are minimal, lying in regions of intermediate water balance. Only records of H. australis are known from areas of potential sympatry in regions where the species’ ranges meet, consistent with exclusion of H. anomalus by H. australis. Heteromys anomalus inhabits areas ecologically suitable for both species only in the isolated Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, in which H. australis is not present (most likely for historical reasons). Furthermore, environmental characteristics of localities of H. anomalus in biogeographic regions where H. australis is absent fit the pattern predicted under competitive release. In contrast, localities of H. australis show no indication of competitive release. Although the results of present analyses do not conclusively demonstrate competitive exclusion or release, they provide directional hypotheses that can now be tested in experimental field and laboratory studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oikos Wiley

Using niche‐based GIS modeling to test geographic predictions of competitive exclusion and competitive release in South American pocket mice

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0030-1299
eISSN
1600-0706
DOI
10.1034/j.1600-0706.2002.t01-1-980116.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Geographic studies addressing the role of competition in determining species’ macrodistributions have been limited by only simple or subjective means of identifying regions of suitable habitat. Now, ecological‐niche models of species’ potential distributions present a possible approach to testing for the geographic patterns predicted under competitive exclusion and competitive release. Previously, we modeled the potential distributions of two spiny pocket mice (Heteromys australis and H. anomalus) in northwestern South America using specimen localities, environmental data, and the Genetic Algorithm for Rule‐Set Prediction (GARP). Here we superimpose the models to examine known distributional records in areas of potential sympatry between the two species, thus testing the geographic predictions of competitive exclusion. In addition, we examine environmental characteristics of known localities, testing for data consistent with competitive release. Areas of potential sympatry are minimal, lying in regions of intermediate water balance. Only records of H. australis are known from areas of potential sympatry in regions where the species’ ranges meet, consistent with exclusion of H. anomalus by H. australis. Heteromys anomalus inhabits areas ecologically suitable for both species only in the isolated Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, in which H. australis is not present (most likely for historical reasons). Furthermore, environmental characteristics of localities of H. anomalus in biogeographic regions where H. australis is absent fit the pattern predicted under competitive release. In contrast, localities of H. australis show no indication of competitive release. Although the results of present analyses do not conclusively demonstrate competitive exclusion or release, they provide directional hypotheses that can now be tested in experimental field and laboratory studies.

Journal

OikosWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2002

References

  • Geographical distributions of spiny pocket mice in South America: insights from predictive models
    Anderson, Anderson; Gómez‐Laverde, Gómez‐Laverde; Peterson, Peterson
  • The geographic range: size, shape, boundaries, and internal structure
    Brown, Brown; Stevens, Stevens; Kaufman, Kaufman
  • Preliminary distributional analysis of US endangered bird species
    Godown, Godown; Peterson, Peterson
  • Modelling faunal responses to climatic gradients with GIS: land snails as a case study
    Kadmon, Kadmon; Heller, Heller
  • Sensitivity of distributional prediction algorithms to geographic data completeness
    Peterson, Peterson; Cohoon, Cohoon
  • Predicting species invasions using ecological niche modeling: new approaches from bioinformatics attack a pressing problem
    Peterson, Peterson; Vieglais, Vieglais
  • Effects of global climate change on geographic distributions of Mexican Cracidae
    Peterson, Peterson; Sánchez‐Cordero, Sánchez‐Cordero; Soberón, Soberón
  • Effects of sample size on accuracy of species distribution models
    Stockwell, Stockwell; Peterson, Peterson
  • Analysis of the distribution of insectivorous bats in Israel
    Yom‐Tov, Yom‐Tov; Kadmon, Kadmon

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