Use of the health belief model in determining frequency of breast self‐examination

Use of the health belief model in determining frequency of breast self‐examination The purpose of this research was to identify the relationships of attitudes about breast self‐examination and breast cancer to the frequency of breast self‐examination. The health belief model was used as a theoretical base. Likert scales were developed for the independent variables of susceptibility, seriousness, benefit, barriers, and health motivation; the dependent variable was frequency of breast self‐examination. A convenience sample of 301 women was drawn from a large metropolitan city. Self‐administered questionnaires contained the developed scales, a measure of frequency of breast self‐examination, and demographic variables. Results supported the health belief model's prediction of frequency of breast self‐examination (R = .51; p ⩽ .01). In addition, the variables of seriousness, benefits, barriers, and health motivation discriminated groupings according to frequency of breast self‐examination. Results support the relationship of the health belief model variable to the behavior of breast self‐examination. Nursing implications are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Nursing & Health Wiley

Use of the health belief model in determining frequency of breast self‐examination

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0160-6891
eISSN
1098-240X
DOI
10.1002/nur.4770080410
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to identify the relationships of attitudes about breast self‐examination and breast cancer to the frequency of breast self‐examination. The health belief model was used as a theoretical base. Likert scales were developed for the independent variables of susceptibility, seriousness, benefit, barriers, and health motivation; the dependent variable was frequency of breast self‐examination. A convenience sample of 301 women was drawn from a large metropolitan city. Self‐administered questionnaires contained the developed scales, a measure of frequency of breast self‐examination, and demographic variables. Results supported the health belief model's prediction of frequency of breast self‐examination (R = .51; p ⩽ .01). In addition, the variables of seriousness, benefits, barriers, and health motivation discriminated groupings according to frequency of breast self‐examination. Results support the relationship of the health belief model variable to the behavior of breast self‐examination. Nursing implications are discussed.

Journal

Research in Nursing & HealthWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1985

References

  • Why people use health services
    Rosenstock, Rosenstock

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