Urinary cortisol responses of longtailed macaques to five cage sizes, tethering, sedation, and room change

Urinary cortisol responses of longtailed macaques to five cage sizes, tethering, sedation, and... Urinary free cortisol responses to five cage sizes, cage level, room change, tethering adaptation, chronic catheterization, and ketamine sedation were measured in 14 female and 14 male wild‐born adult Macaca fascicularis. Urinary free cortisol, a physiological measure of psychological well‐being that can be collected unobtrusively, provided a measure of the animals' general adrenocortical response to various conditions over a time course of hours. Urinary free cortisol values in response to stimulation with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) validated the measure as a reflection of blood values. Cortisol values were expressed as a ratio to creatinine, which normalized for differences in urinary output and body weight (muscle mass). Cage size (20–140% of regulation floor area) and housing level (upper vs. lower cage) had no effect on stress, as measured by cortisol excretion. Room change elicited a slight increase in cortisol excretion for the first day, but not to a level suggesting stress. Sedation, surgery, some aspects of tethering adaptation, and chronic catheterization produced urinary cortisol evidence of stress. Even so, animals varied in their responses and all showed adaptation. Males and females did not differ in normal mean values but females tended to have higher cortisol levels in response to potential stressors investigated in this study. Cortisol levels continued to decline gradually throughout the study. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Primatology Wiley

Urinary cortisol responses of longtailed macaques to five cage sizes, tethering, sedation, and room change

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0275-2565
eISSN
1098-2345
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajp.1350300105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Urinary free cortisol responses to five cage sizes, cage level, room change, tethering adaptation, chronic catheterization, and ketamine sedation were measured in 14 female and 14 male wild‐born adult Macaca fascicularis. Urinary free cortisol, a physiological measure of psychological well‐being that can be collected unobtrusively, provided a measure of the animals' general adrenocortical response to various conditions over a time course of hours. Urinary free cortisol values in response to stimulation with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) validated the measure as a reflection of blood values. Cortisol values were expressed as a ratio to creatinine, which normalized for differences in urinary output and body weight (muscle mass). Cage size (20–140% of regulation floor area) and housing level (upper vs. lower cage) had no effect on stress, as measured by cortisol excretion. Room change elicited a slight increase in cortisol excretion for the first day, but not to a level suggesting stress. Sedation, surgery, some aspects of tethering adaptation, and chronic catheterization produced urinary cortisol evidence of stress. Even so, animals varied in their responses and all showed adaptation. Males and females did not differ in normal mean values but females tended to have higher cortisol levels in response to potential stressors investigated in this study. Cortisol levels continued to decline gradually throughout the study. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

American Journal of PrimatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1993

References

  • Effects of woodchips and buried food on behavior patterns and psychological well‐being of captive rhesus monkeys
    Byrne, Byrne; Suomi, Suomi
  • Rhesus plasma cortisol responses at four dominance positions
    Chamove, Chamove; Bowman, Bowman
  • Assessing the effects of social environment on blood pressure and heart rates of baboons
    Coelho, Coelho; Carey, Carey; Shade, Shade
  • Increased cage size does not alter heart rate or behavior in female rhesus monkeys
    Line, Line; Morgan, Morgan; Markowitz, Markowitz; Strong, Strong
  • Excretion of radiolabeled estradiol metabolites in the slow loris ( Nycticebus coucang )
    Perez, Perez; Czekala, Czekala; Weisenseel, Weisenseel; Lasley, Lasley
  • Effects of anesthetic agents on the adrenocortical system of female baboons
    Walker, Walker; Pepe, Pepe; Garnett, Garnett; Albrecht, Albrecht

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