Uric acid best predicts metabolically unhealthy obesity with increased cardiovascular risk in youth and adults

Uric acid best predicts metabolically unhealthy obesity with increased cardiovascular risk in... Objective: The obesity prevalence is growing worldwide and largely responsible for cardiovascular disease, the most common cause of death in the western world. The rationale of this study was to distinguish metabolically healthy from unhealthy overweight/obese young and adult patients as compared to healthy normal weight age matched controls by an extensive anthropometric, laboratory, and sonographic vascular assessment. Design and Methods: Three hundred fifty five young (8 to < 18 years, 299 overweight/obese(ow/ob), 56 normal weight (nw)) and 354 adult (>18‐60 years, 175 (ow/ob), 179 nw)) participants of the STYJOBS/EDECTA (STYrian Juvenile Obesity Study/Early DEteCTion of Atherosclerosis) cohort were analyzed. STYJOBS/EDECTA (NCT00482924) is a crossectional study to investigate metabolic/cardiovascular risk profiles in normal and ow/ob people free of disease except metabolic syndrome (MetS). Results: From 299 young ow/ob subjects (8‐< 18 years), 108 (36%), and from 175 adult ow/ob subjects (>18‐60 years), 79 (45%) had positive criteria for MetS. In both age groups, prevalence of MetS was greater among males. Overweight/obese subjects were divided into “healthy” (no MetS criterion except anthropometry fulfilled) and “unhealthy” (MetS positive). Although percentage body fat did not differ between “healthy” and “unhealthy” ow/ob, nuchal and visceral fat were significantly greater in the “unhealthy” group which had also significantly higher values of carotid intima media thickness (IMT). With MetS as the dependent variable, two logistic regressions including juveniles <18 years or adults >18 years were performed. The potential predictor variables selected with the exception of age and gender by t test comparisons included IMT, ultrasensitive c‐reactive protein (US‐CRP), IL‐6, malondialdehyde (MDA), oxidized LDL, leptin, adiponectin, uric acid (UA), aldosterone, cortisol, transaminases, fibrinogen. In both groups, uric acid and in adults only, leptin and adiponectin, turned out as the best predictor. Conclusion: Serum levels of UA are a significant predictor of unhealthy obesity in juveniles and adults. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Obesity Wiley

Uric acid best predicts metabolically unhealthy obesity with increased cardiovascular risk in youth and adults

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1930-7381
eISSN
1930-739X
DOI
10.1002/oby.20061
pmid
23401248
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective: The obesity prevalence is growing worldwide and largely responsible for cardiovascular disease, the most common cause of death in the western world. The rationale of this study was to distinguish metabolically healthy from unhealthy overweight/obese young and adult patients as compared to healthy normal weight age matched controls by an extensive anthropometric, laboratory, and sonographic vascular assessment. Design and Methods: Three hundred fifty five young (8 to < 18 years, 299 overweight/obese(ow/ob), 56 normal weight (nw)) and 354 adult (>18‐60 years, 175 (ow/ob), 179 nw)) participants of the STYJOBS/EDECTA (STYrian Juvenile Obesity Study/Early DEteCTion of Atherosclerosis) cohort were analyzed. STYJOBS/EDECTA (NCT00482924) is a crossectional study to investigate metabolic/cardiovascular risk profiles in normal and ow/ob people free of disease except metabolic syndrome (MetS). Results: From 299 young ow/ob subjects (8‐< 18 years), 108 (36%), and from 175 adult ow/ob subjects (>18‐60 years), 79 (45%) had positive criteria for MetS. In both age groups, prevalence of MetS was greater among males. Overweight/obese subjects were divided into “healthy” (no MetS criterion except anthropometry fulfilled) and “unhealthy” (MetS positive). Although percentage body fat did not differ between “healthy” and “unhealthy” ow/ob, nuchal and visceral fat were significantly greater in the “unhealthy” group which had also significantly higher values of carotid intima media thickness (IMT). With MetS as the dependent variable, two logistic regressions including juveniles <18 years or adults >18 years were performed. The potential predictor variables selected with the exception of age and gender by t test comparisons included IMT, ultrasensitive c‐reactive protein (US‐CRP), IL‐6, malondialdehyde (MDA), oxidized LDL, leptin, adiponectin, uric acid (UA), aldosterone, cortisol, transaminases, fibrinogen. In both groups, uric acid and in adults only, leptin and adiponectin, turned out as the best predictor. Conclusion: Serum levels of UA are a significant predictor of unhealthy obesity in juveniles and adults.

Journal

ObesityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2013

References

  • Preatherosclerosis and adiponectin subfractions in obese adolescents
    Mangge, H; Almer, G; Haj‐Yahya, S
  • Determination of myeloperoxidase in EDTA plasma: comparison of an enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay with a chemiluminescent automated immunoassay
    Zelzer, S; Khoschsorur, G; Stettin, M
  • Elevated serum uric acid levels in metabolic syndrome: an active component or an innocent bystander?
    Tsouli, SG; Liberopoulos, EN; Mikhailidis, DP
  • Serum uric acid and cardiovascular disease: recent developments, and where do they leave us?
    Baker, JF; Krishnan, E; Chen, L
  • Decreased plasma antioxidants in patients with Alzheimer's disease
    Kim, TS; Pae, CU; Yoon, SJ
  • Insulin‐sensitive obesity
    Kloting, N; Fasshauer, M; Dietrich, A

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