Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Up Close and Personal: Photography Displays in a Physical Space

Up Close and Personal: Photography Displays in a Physical Space With the advent of digital technology, far more people are taking photographs than ever before. So too we have witnessed a proliferation of people sharing images, now via the Internet and digital devices, so much so that the in‐person experience of a display of photographs has taken a back seat. However, again thanks to digital technology, the means to print one's own photographs has become much easier than in the past, including large and high quality prints. As a psychologist and photographer who studies how people create, share, and react to images in this age of digital photography and online photo‐sharing, I recently turned my attention back to the tradition of an in‐person display of photographs. This research led to a photography exhibition Photographic Psychology: Forces that Shape the Psyche , which took place at the Rider University Art Gallery in 2012. The exhibition consisted of 60 images with titles and short descriptions for each one (see tinyurl.com/crgy29w ). Each image represented a different force that shapes our sense of self and identity, such as family, emotions, dissociation, selfobjects, addiction, separation, childhood trauma, developmental stages, and the unconscious. The purpose of the exhibition was three‐fold: (1) to provide http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Up Close and Personal: Photography Displays in a Physical Space

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/up-close-and-personal-photography-displays-in-a-physical-space-Z5TZnbkHib
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1359
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

With the advent of digital technology, far more people are taking photographs than ever before. So too we have witnessed a proliferation of people sharing images, now via the Internet and digital devices, so much so that the in‐person experience of a display of photographs has taken a back seat. However, again thanks to digital technology, the means to print one's own photographs has become much easier than in the past, including large and high quality prints. As a psychologist and photographer who studies how people create, share, and react to images in this age of digital photography and online photo‐sharing, I recently turned my attention back to the tradition of an in‐person display of photographs. This research led to a photography exhibition Photographic Psychology: Forces that Shape the Psyche , which took place at the Rider University Art Gallery in 2012. The exhibition consisted of 60 images with titles and short descriptions for each one (see tinyurl.com/crgy29w ). Each image represented a different force that shapes our sense of self and identity, such as family, emotions, dissociation, selfobjects, addiction, separation, childhood trauma, developmental stages, and the unconscious. The purpose of the exhibition was three‐fold: (1) to provide

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.