Uniform phenotype conceals double colonization by reed‐warblers of a remote Pacific archipelago

Uniform phenotype conceals double colonization by reed‐warblers of a remote Pacific archipelago Aim Remote oceanic islands often provide good illustrations of adaptive radiations, but phylogenetic studies have also demonstrated unexpected multiple colonization events for a given archipelago. In this study we investigate the relationships among endemic populations of the Marquesas reed‐warbler, Acrocephalus mendanae Tristram, 1883, which have colonized nearly all islands of this remote Polynesian archipelago, and which exhibit a very uniform plumage pattern. We study the phylogeny and morphology of all subspecies in the Marquesas, providing an examination of the position of the Marquesas lineages in relation to reed‐warblers distributed across multiple Polynesian archipelagos. Location This study focused on all the main islands of the Marquesas archipelago, along with samples from other Polynesian archipelagos (Society, Tuamotu, Austral, Cook, Kiribati) and Australia. Methods We used mitochondrial DNA markers (cytochrome b and ND2 genes) to develop a phylogeny of the main eastern Polynesian taxa. All subspecies for the Marquesas were investigated, including multiple individuals per island. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum‐likelihood and Bayesian approaches were employed to infer relationships among A. mendanae populations and between the main Polynesian archipelagos. Morphometric analyses based on 110 specimens from museum collections were performed on external characters to investigate the differences between islands, and these results were compared to the phylogeny. Results Our data indicate that the Marquesas reed‐warbler is in fact a polyphyletic taxon including two independent lineages: the northern Marquesas reed‐warbler, closely related to the Tuamotu reed‐warbler, and the southern Marquesas reed‐warbler, sister taxon to that endemic to the Kiribati. Analyses of morphological characters show that the size and shape features of the Marquesas reed‐warblers exhibit high plasticity linked to adaptation to ecological factors, particularly habitat richness (the diversity of vegetation structure that provides suitable resources and habitat for reed‐warblers, simplified here as the number of indigenous plant species). Main conclusions Our results suggest that reed‐warblers have successfully colonized the Marquesas archipelago, one of the most remote groups of islands in the Pacific Ocean, at least twice. Both events occurred more or less simultaneously at ca. 0.6 Ma, and are more recent than the islands' formation. We outline the taxonomic consequences of our phylogeny and discuss the supertramp strategy of reed‐warblers in the Pacific. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Biogeography Wiley

Uniform phenotype conceals double colonization by reed‐warblers of a remote Pacific archipelago

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/uniform-phenotype-conceals-double-colonization-by-reed-warblers-of-a-YSlONAXYPD
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0305-0270
eISSN
1365-2699
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2699.2007.01703.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aim Remote oceanic islands often provide good illustrations of adaptive radiations, but phylogenetic studies have also demonstrated unexpected multiple colonization events for a given archipelago. In this study we investigate the relationships among endemic populations of the Marquesas reed‐warbler, Acrocephalus mendanae Tristram, 1883, which have colonized nearly all islands of this remote Polynesian archipelago, and which exhibit a very uniform plumage pattern. We study the phylogeny and morphology of all subspecies in the Marquesas, providing an examination of the position of the Marquesas lineages in relation to reed‐warblers distributed across multiple Polynesian archipelagos. Location This study focused on all the main islands of the Marquesas archipelago, along with samples from other Polynesian archipelagos (Society, Tuamotu, Austral, Cook, Kiribati) and Australia. Methods We used mitochondrial DNA markers (cytochrome b and ND2 genes) to develop a phylogeny of the main eastern Polynesian taxa. All subspecies for the Marquesas were investigated, including multiple individuals per island. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum‐likelihood and Bayesian approaches were employed to infer relationships among A. mendanae populations and between the main Polynesian archipelagos. Morphometric analyses based on 110 specimens from museum collections were performed on external characters to investigate the differences between islands, and these results were compared to the phylogeny. Results Our data indicate that the Marquesas reed‐warbler is in fact a polyphyletic taxon including two independent lineages: the northern Marquesas reed‐warbler, closely related to the Tuamotu reed‐warbler, and the southern Marquesas reed‐warbler, sister taxon to that endemic to the Kiribati. Analyses of morphological characters show that the size and shape features of the Marquesas reed‐warblers exhibit high plasticity linked to adaptation to ecological factors, particularly habitat richness (the diversity of vegetation structure that provides suitable resources and habitat for reed‐warblers, simplified here as the number of indigenous plant species). Main conclusions Our results suggest that reed‐warblers have successfully colonized the Marquesas archipelago, one of the most remote groups of islands in the Pacific Ocean, at least twice. Both events occurred more or less simultaneously at ca. 0.6 Ma, and are more recent than the islands' formation. We outline the taxonomic consequences of our phylogeny and discuss the supertramp strategy of reed‐warblers in the Pacific.

Journal

Journal of BiogeographyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2007

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off