UNDERSTANDING RESPONSES TO MULTI‐SOURCE FEEDBACK: THE ROLE OF CORE SELF‐EVALUATIONS

UNDERSTANDING RESPONSES TO MULTI‐SOURCE FEEDBACK: THE ROLE OF CORE SELF‐EVALUATIONS This longitudinal study examines the role of core self‐evaluations in responses to multisource feedback. Consistent with past research, feedback recipients were most satisfied when others' ratings were high. Core self‐evaluations was not related to satisfaction with feedback, but was positively linked to goal commitment 4 months after feedback. Polynomial regression results reveal a complex pattern of associations among core self‐evaluations, ratings, satisfaction, and commitment to developmental goals. Specifically, individuals with high core self‐evaluations were most committed to developmental goals when self and others' ratings were discrepant. In contrast, individuals with low core self‐evaluations were most committed to developmental goals when self and others' ratings were in agreement. Our results question the notion that satisfaction with feedback affects motivation to improve and highlight the importance of personality in motivation to improve following feedback. We discuss practical and theoretical implications of our findings and provide a theoretical framework for future research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

UNDERSTANDING RESPONSES TO MULTI‐SOURCE FEEDBACK: THE ROLE OF CORE SELF‐EVALUATIONS

Personnel Psychology, Volume 58 (1) – Mar 1, 2005

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.2005.00633.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This longitudinal study examines the role of core self‐evaluations in responses to multisource feedback. Consistent with past research, feedback recipients were most satisfied when others' ratings were high. Core self‐evaluations was not related to satisfaction with feedback, but was positively linked to goal commitment 4 months after feedback. Polynomial regression results reveal a complex pattern of associations among core self‐evaluations, ratings, satisfaction, and commitment to developmental goals. Specifically, individuals with high core self‐evaluations were most committed to developmental goals when self and others' ratings were discrepant. In contrast, individuals with low core self‐evaluations were most committed to developmental goals when self and others' ratings were in agreement. Our results question the notion that satisfaction with feedback affects motivation to improve and highlight the importance of personality in motivation to improve following feedback. We discuss practical and theoretical implications of our findings and provide a theoretical framework for future research.

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2005

References

  • Designing an effective 360‐degree appraisal feedback process
    Antonioni, Antonioni
  • Self‐ versus others' ratings as predictors of assessment center ratings: Validation evidence for 360‐degree feedback programs
    Atkins, Atkins; Wood, Wood
  • Core self‐evaluations: A review of the trait and its role in job satisfaction and job performance
    Bono, Bono; Judge, Judge
  • Multisource assessment programs in organizations: An insider's perspective
    Brutus, Brutus; Derayeh, Derayeh
  • Work and family stress and well‐being: An examination of person‐environment fit in the work and family domains
    Edwards, Edwards; Rothbard, Rothbard
  • Reactions of leaders to 360‐degree feedback from subordinates and peers
    Facteau, Facteau; Facteau, Facteau; Schoel, Schoel; Russell, Russell; Poteet, Poteet
  • The core self‐evaluations scale: Development of a measure
    Judge, Judge; Erez, Erez; Bono, Bono; Thoresen, Thoresen
  • Exploring relations between typical and maximum performance ratings and the five‐factor model of personality
    Ployhart, Ployhart; Lim, Lim; Chan, Chan
  • An examination of the effects of an upward feedback program over time
    Smither, Smither; London, London; Vasilopoulos, Vasilopoulos; Reilly, Reilly; Millsap, Millsap; Salvemini, Salvemini
  • A five‐year study of upward feedback: What managers do with their results matters
    Walker, Walker; Smither, Smither

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