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Understanding Kombucha Tea Fermentation: A Review

Understanding Kombucha Tea Fermentation: A Review IntroductionFermentation is one of the most antique methods of food preservation. It is also a low‐cost energy conservation system, which is essential to ensure the life and safety of food. Many biochemical changes occur during fermentation and may affect the nutrient compounds and consequently the properties of the final product, like the bioactivity and digestibility. Recently, this bioprocess has been applied for the production and extraction of bioactive compounds from plants in food and beverage industries (Hur, Lee, Kim, Choi, & Kim, ).Kombucha tea is obtained from a symbiotic culture of acetic acid bacteria (AAB; Komagataeibacter, Gluconobacter, and Acetobacter species) (Roos & Vuyst, ), lactic acid bacteria (LAB; Lactobacillus, Lactococcus) (Marsh, Hill, Ross, & Cotter, ), and yeasts (Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Kloeckera apiculata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Brettanomyces bruxellensis) (Coton et al., ) in a sweet medium, generally black tea. Its fermentation process also leads to the formation of a floating biofilm on the surface of the growth medium due to the activity of certain strains of AAB (Watawana, Jayawardena, Gunawardhana, & Waisundara, ). The main acids present are acetic, gluconic, tartaric, malic, and in less proportion citric acid. All these acids are responsible for its characteristic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Science Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®
ISSN
0022-1147
eISSN
1750-3841
DOI
10.1111/1750-3841.14068
pmid
29508944
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionFermentation is one of the most antique methods of food preservation. It is also a low‐cost energy conservation system, which is essential to ensure the life and safety of food. Many biochemical changes occur during fermentation and may affect the nutrient compounds and consequently the properties of the final product, like the bioactivity and digestibility. Recently, this bioprocess has been applied for the production and extraction of bioactive compounds from plants in food and beverage industries (Hur, Lee, Kim, Choi, & Kim, ).Kombucha tea is obtained from a symbiotic culture of acetic acid bacteria (AAB; Komagataeibacter, Gluconobacter, and Acetobacter species) (Roos & Vuyst, ), lactic acid bacteria (LAB; Lactobacillus, Lactococcus) (Marsh, Hill, Ross, & Cotter, ), and yeasts (Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Kloeckera apiculata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Brettanomyces bruxellensis) (Coton et al., ) in a sweet medium, generally black tea. Its fermentation process also leads to the formation of a floating biofilm on the surface of the growth medium due to the activity of certain strains of AAB (Watawana, Jayawardena, Gunawardhana, & Waisundara, ). The main acids present are acetic, gluconic, tartaric, malic, and in less proportion citric acid. All these acids are responsible for its characteristic

Journal

Journal of Food ScienceWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References