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Understanding communication and coordination among government and service organisations after a disaster

Understanding communication and coordination among government and service organisations after a... The purpose of this study is to discover how coordination and communication between the government and service organisations responsible for the relief effort following Hurricane Katrina contributed to the poor outcomes for the communities impacted by the storm. Two hypotheses were tested in this study: communication was positively correlated with the degree of coordination immediately following Katrina; and miscommunication was negatively correlated with the degree of coordination after the storm. Quantitative content analysis of media reports was used to analyse the data and test the hypotheses. Both communication and miscommunication were found to be positively correlated with coordination. The results of this study suggest that increasing interorganisational communication and establishing clearly defined roles for organisations must be a high priority in revamping organisational protocol on disaster response if any new approach is to be successful. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disasters Wiley

Understanding communication and coordination among government and service organisations after a disaster

Disasters , Volume 39 (4) – Oct 1, 2015

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References (27)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Overseas Development Institute, 2015
ISSN
0361-3666
eISSN
1467-7717
DOI
10.1111/disa.12130
pmid
25752601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to discover how coordination and communication between the government and service organisations responsible for the relief effort following Hurricane Katrina contributed to the poor outcomes for the communities impacted by the storm. Two hypotheses were tested in this study: communication was positively correlated with the degree of coordination immediately following Katrina; and miscommunication was negatively correlated with the degree of coordination after the storm. Quantitative content analysis of media reports was used to analyse the data and test the hypotheses. Both communication and miscommunication were found to be positively correlated with coordination. The results of this study suggest that increasing interorganisational communication and establishing clearly defined roles for organisations must be a high priority in revamping organisational protocol on disaster response if any new approach is to be successful.

Journal

DisastersWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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