TURC: A diagnostic model of continental gross primary productivity and net primary productivity

TURC: A diagnostic model of continental gross primary productivity and net primary productivity TURC, a diagnostic model for the estimation of continental gross primary productivity (GPP) and net primary productivity (NPP), is presented. This model uses a remotely sensed vegetation index to estimate the fraction of solar radiation absorbed by canopies, and an original parameterization of the relationship between absorbed solar radiation and GPP, based on measurements of CO2 fluxes above plant canopies. An independent, uncalibrated model of autotrophic maintenance and growth respiration is parameterized from literature data, and uses databases on temperature, biomass, and remotely sensed vegetation index. This model results in global estimates of GPP and NPP of 133.1 and 62.3 Gt(C) per year, respectively, which is consistent with commonly admitted values. The ratio of autotrophic respiration to GPP is about 70% for equatorial rain forests and 50% for temperate forests, as a result the highest predicted NPP are in tropical savannas of Africa and South America, and in temperate, highly cultivated zones of North America, not in equatorial rain forest zones. Conversion efficiencies defined as the ratio of yearly integrated NPP to absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) compare relatively well with a previous compilation of literature values, except for ecosystems with probable reduction of conversion efficiency due to water stress. Several sensitivity studies are performed on some input data sets, model assumptions, and model parameters. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Biogeochemical Cycles Wiley

TURC: A diagnostic model of continental gross primary productivity and net primary productivity

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0886-6236
eISSN
1944-9224
DOI
10.1029/96GB00349
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

TURC, a diagnostic model for the estimation of continental gross primary productivity (GPP) and net primary productivity (NPP), is presented. This model uses a remotely sensed vegetation index to estimate the fraction of solar radiation absorbed by canopies, and an original parameterization of the relationship between absorbed solar radiation and GPP, based on measurements of CO2 fluxes above plant canopies. An independent, uncalibrated model of autotrophic maintenance and growth respiration is parameterized from literature data, and uses databases on temperature, biomass, and remotely sensed vegetation index. This model results in global estimates of GPP and NPP of 133.1 and 62.3 Gt(C) per year, respectively, which is consistent with commonly admitted values. The ratio of autotrophic respiration to GPP is about 70% for equatorial rain forests and 50% for temperate forests, as a result the highest predicted NPP are in tropical savannas of Africa and South America, and in temperate, highly cultivated zones of North America, not in equatorial rain forest zones. Conversion efficiencies defined as the ratio of yearly integrated NPP to absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) compare relatively well with a previous compilation of literature values, except for ecosystems with probable reduction of conversion efficiency due to water stress. Several sensitivity studies are performed on some input data sets, model assumptions, and model parameters.

Journal

Global Biogeochemical CyclesWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1996

References

  • The role of maintenance respiration in plant growth
    Amthor, Amthor
  • Effect of model structure on the response of terrestrial biosphere models to CO 2 and temperature increase
    Harvey, Harvey
  • Respiration for growth, maintenance and ion uptake: An evaluation of concepts, methods, values and their significance
    Lambers, Lambers; Szaniawski, Szaniawski; Visser, Visser
  • Seasonal changes of leaf area index (LAI) in a tropical deciduous forest in west Mexico
    Maas, Maas; Vpse, Vpse; T Swank, T Swank; Martinez‐Yrizar, Martinez‐Yrizar
  • Woody‐tissue respiration for Simarouba amara and Minquartia guianensis, two tropical wet forest trees with different growth habits
    Ryan, Ryan; Hubbard, Hubbard; Clark, Clark; Stanford, Stanford
  • CARAIB: a global model of terrestrial biological productivity
    Warnant, Warnant; François, François; Strivay, Strivay; Gérard, Gérard

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