Tree performance on minespoils in the South Wales coalfield

Tree performance on minespoils in the South Wales coalfield Summary 1. Variable growth of Larix leptolepis (Japanese larch) has been observed on restored opencast coal workings in South Wales. This has implications for the restoration of such sites. A study of the relationship of tree growth with minespoil chemical, nutritional, physical and hydrological factors was carried out. 2. Tree growth was positively related to nitrogen and phosphorus foliar concentrations, but negatively to those of magnesium. Seventy‐three per cent of the variation in tree growth was explained by variation in foliar chemistry. 3. Soil pH and extractable magnesium were negatively correlated with tree growth, with cation exchange capacity positively related to it. 4. Minespoils had bulk densities that commonly exceeded 1·7 g cm–3 below 0·2 m depth. Stone contents were high and typically 25% by volume. 5. Root systems of trees excavated were characterized by a high root density within 0·3 m of the minespoil surface. Restricted rooting was attributed to high bulk density and the incidence of shallow water tables. 6. Waterlogging during the spring and early summer, and the consequent presence of anaerobic soil conditions during periods of active growth, was found to be detrimental to tree growth. 7. The study suggests that landform design, selection of suitable soil or soil‐forming materials, spoil placement technique and appropriate species choice are central to the future success of forestry schemes on restored ground in South Wales. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Ecology Wiley

Tree performance on minespoils in the South Wales coalfield

Journal of Applied Ecology, Volume 36 (5) – Oct 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/tree-performance-on-minespoils-in-the-south-wales-coalfield-Xgo3DI9msk
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-8901
eISSN
1365-2664
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2664.1999.00444.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary 1. Variable growth of Larix leptolepis (Japanese larch) has been observed on restored opencast coal workings in South Wales. This has implications for the restoration of such sites. A study of the relationship of tree growth with minespoil chemical, nutritional, physical and hydrological factors was carried out. 2. Tree growth was positively related to nitrogen and phosphorus foliar concentrations, but negatively to those of magnesium. Seventy‐three per cent of the variation in tree growth was explained by variation in foliar chemistry. 3. Soil pH and extractable magnesium were negatively correlated with tree growth, with cation exchange capacity positively related to it. 4. Minespoils had bulk densities that commonly exceeded 1·7 g cm–3 below 0·2 m depth. Stone contents were high and typically 25% by volume. 5. Root systems of trees excavated were characterized by a high root density within 0·3 m of the minespoil surface. Restricted rooting was attributed to high bulk density and the incidence of shallow water tables. 6. Waterlogging during the spring and early summer, and the consequent presence of anaerobic soil conditions during periods of active growth, was found to be detrimental to tree growth. 7. The study suggests that landform design, selection of suitable soil or soil‐forming materials, spoil placement technique and appropriate species choice are central to the future success of forestry schemes on restored ground in South Wales.

Journal

Journal of Applied EcologyWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1999

References

  • Rapid method for the determination of cation‐exchange capacity of calcareous and non‐calcareous soils.
    Bascomb, Bascomb
  • Clay minerals as an index of the degree of metamorphism of the carbonate and terrigenous rocks in the South Wales coalfield.
    Gill, Gill; Khalaf, Khalaf; Massoud, Massoud
  • Nitrate absorption and assimilation in ryegrass as influenced by calcium and magnesium.
    Morgan, Morgan; Jackson, Jackson; Volk, Volk

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off