Transport of Chloride Through an Unsaturated Field Soil

Transport of Chloride Through an Unsaturated Field Soil A chloride tracer was applied to the surface of a vegetable field and then leached downward by rainfall and irrigation. Tracer concentrations in a vertical two‐dimensional region down to a depth of 2.4 m were monitored with suction cups that, were installed horizontally from a tunnel. The uniformly applied tracer pulse split into a slowly moving main pulse and a series of fast pulses. The first of the fast pulses reached a depth of 2.2 m after an infiltration of just 31 mm of natural rainfall, whereas the peak of the main pulse was still at a depth of 0.84 m by the end of the experiment after an infiltration of 0.853 m. The movement of the main pulse can be described by a convection‐dispersion process in a homogeneous medium, provided that time is replaced by cumulative infiltration. However, the values of the parameters that produce a maximum agreement between the model and the observed main pulse have no physical basis, and consequently prediction of solute movement, based on measurements of soil properties, is not possible. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Transport of Chloride Through an Unsaturated Field Soil

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/transport-of-chloride-through-an-unsaturated-field-soil-nkz5EMMCSm
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
DOI
10.1029/91WR01771
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A chloride tracer was applied to the surface of a vegetable field and then leached downward by rainfall and irrigation. Tracer concentrations in a vertical two‐dimensional region down to a depth of 2.4 m were monitored with suction cups that, were installed horizontally from a tunnel. The uniformly applied tracer pulse split into a slowly moving main pulse and a series of fast pulses. The first of the fast pulses reached a depth of 2.2 m after an infiltration of just 31 mm of natural rainfall, whereas the peak of the main pulse was still at a depth of 0.84 m by the end of the experiment after an infiltration of 0.853 m. The movement of the main pulse can be described by a convection‐dispersion process in a homogeneous medium, provided that time is replaced by cumulative infiltration. However, the values of the parameters that produce a maximum agreement between the model and the observed main pulse have no physical basis, and consequently prediction of solute movement, based on measurements of soil properties, is not possible.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1991

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off