Transition‐Metal‐Catalyzed Regioselective Asymmetric Mono‐Hydrogenation of Dienes and Polyenes

Transition‐Metal‐Catalyzed Regioselective Asymmetric Mono‐Hydrogenation of Dienes and Polyenes Organic compounds containing multiple C=C bonds are attractive substrates for catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation. The full saturation of prochiral double bonds, controlling the creation of two or more stereocenters in one step, is obviously a remarkable goal. However, another fascinating and useful option is to selectively introduce a new defined stereogenic center while leaving other double bonds untouched. Thus, the retained functionalities can be further exploited in synthesis. Examples of regio‐ and enantioselective mono‐hydrogenations of polyolefins are highlighted in this Concept article, and are divided according to the nature of the reduced double bond and the transition‐metal catalyst used. Alkenes bearing coordinating functional groups are often preferentially hydrogenated by Rh‐ and Ru‐complexes, while the more recently developed Ir‐based catalysts promote the selective saturation on alkyl‐substituted olefins. Relevant applications of this effective methodology in the synthesis of natural products are included to demonstrate its value in organic synthesis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Chemistry - A European Journal Wiley

Transition‐Metal‐Catalyzed Regioselective Asymmetric Mono‐Hydrogenation of Dienes and Polyenes

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/transition-metal-catalyzed-regioselective-asymmetric-mono-byA0pwk6Av
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
0947-6539
eISSN
1521-3765
D.O.I.
10.1002/chem.201800414
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Organic compounds containing multiple C=C bonds are attractive substrates for catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation. The full saturation of prochiral double bonds, controlling the creation of two or more stereocenters in one step, is obviously a remarkable goal. However, another fascinating and useful option is to selectively introduce a new defined stereogenic center while leaving other double bonds untouched. Thus, the retained functionalities can be further exploited in synthesis. Examples of regio‐ and enantioselective mono‐hydrogenations of polyolefins are highlighted in this Concept article, and are divided according to the nature of the reduced double bond and the transition‐metal catalyst used. Alkenes bearing coordinating functional groups are often preferentially hydrogenated by Rh‐ and Ru‐complexes, while the more recently developed Ir‐based catalysts promote the selective saturation on alkyl‐substituted olefins. Relevant applications of this effective methodology in the synthesis of natural products are included to demonstrate its value in organic synthesis.

Journal

Chemistry - A European JournalWiley

Published: Jan 7, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off