Transgenic chinese hamster V79 cell lines which exhibit variable levels of gpt mutagenesis

Transgenic chinese hamster V79 cell lines which exhibit variable levels of gpt mutagenesis The Escherichia coli gpt gene coding for xanthine‐guanine phosphoribosyl transferase has been stably transfected into HPRT− Chinese hamster V79 cells. Several gpt− cell lines have been established, which retain the sequence(s) even after long‐term culture without selection for gpt. Each cell line exhibits a characteristic spontaneous mutation frequency (10−5 to 10−2 in 6‐thioguanine (6TG) selection. While spontaneous mutagenesis to gpt− occurs rather frequently for most cell lines, it cannot be correlated with either the number of plasmid integration sites or deletion of the plasmid sequence(s). One transgenic cell line (g12), which continuously maintains a low spontaneous mutation frequency (˜3 × 10−5), was used in comparative mutagenesis studies with wild‐type V79 cells (gpt vs. hprt). Aklylating agents such as N‐methyl‐N×‐nitro‐N‐nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and β‐propiolactone (BPL) are shown to be equally toxic and mutagenic in both g12 and V79 cells. UV and X‐rays are also equally toxic to both cell lines. The gpt locus of the g12 transfectants, however, is two to three times more sensitive to UV and 2.5—4.5 times more sensitive to X‐ray mutagenesis than the endogenous hprt of wild‐type V79 cells. The data presented here suggests that g12 cells may be useful to study mammalian mutagenesis by agents which yield limited response at the hprt locus. Future studies with these transgenic cells and other transgenic lines are planned to compare the mutability and repair of the same gene (gpt) at different integration sites in mammalian cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis Wiley

Transgenic chinese hamster V79 cell lines which exhibit variable levels of gpt mutagenesis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/transgenic-chinese-hamster-v79-cell-lines-which-exhibit-variable-WTyzJ0e4xc
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0893-6692
eISSN
1098-2280
DOI
10.1002/em.2850160102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Escherichia coli gpt gene coding for xanthine‐guanine phosphoribosyl transferase has been stably transfected into HPRT− Chinese hamster V79 cells. Several gpt− cell lines have been established, which retain the sequence(s) even after long‐term culture without selection for gpt. Each cell line exhibits a characteristic spontaneous mutation frequency (10−5 to 10−2 in 6‐thioguanine (6TG) selection. While spontaneous mutagenesis to gpt− occurs rather frequently for most cell lines, it cannot be correlated with either the number of plasmid integration sites or deletion of the plasmid sequence(s). One transgenic cell line (g12), which continuously maintains a low spontaneous mutation frequency (˜3 × 10−5), was used in comparative mutagenesis studies with wild‐type V79 cells (gpt vs. hprt). Aklylating agents such as N‐methyl‐N×‐nitro‐N‐nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and β‐propiolactone (BPL) are shown to be equally toxic and mutagenic in both g12 and V79 cells. UV and X‐rays are also equally toxic to both cell lines. The gpt locus of the g12 transfectants, however, is two to three times more sensitive to UV and 2.5—4.5 times more sensitive to X‐ray mutagenesis than the endogenous hprt of wild‐type V79 cells. The data presented here suggests that g12 cells may be useful to study mammalian mutagenesis by agents which yield limited response at the hprt locus. Future studies with these transgenic cells and other transgenic lines are planned to compare the mutability and repair of the same gene (gpt) at different integration sites in mammalian cells.

Journal

Environmental and Molecular MutagenesisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1990

References

  • A human endonuclease incises ultraviolet‐irradiated DNA at cytosines and oxidized DNA at thymines
    Gallagher, Gallagher; Weiss, Weiss; Brent, Brent; Duker, Duker
  • 8‐Azaguanine resistance in mammalian cells
    Gillen, Gillen; Roufa, Roufa; Beaudel, Beaudel; Caskey, Caskey
  • From DNA damage to mutation in mammalian cells: A review
    Rossman, Rossman; Klein, Klein

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off