Transactivation properties of parsley proline‐rich bZIP transcription factors

Transactivation properties of parsley proline‐rich bZIP transcription factors Light‐responsive chalcone synthase (CHS) gene activation requires LRUCHS, a light regulatory promoter unit including the MYB recognition element MRECHS and the ACGT‐containing element ACECHS. ACECHS is bound by the parsley basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) factors CPRF1 and 4. Factors containing the bZIP domain exist in animals, plants and yeast, and recognize DNA sequence‐specifically after formation of homo‐ or heterodimers. To determine the potential role of CPRFs in the regulation of CHS promoter activity, we investigated the functions of distinct CPRF domains in a homologous co‐transfection system. The proline‐rich domains of CPRF1 and CPRF4 activate transcription, indicating that CPRF1 and CPRF4 have transactivating properties. Over‐expression of the CPRF1 bZIP domain caused a reduction of LRUCHS‐mediated light inducibility, and point mutations throughout ACECHS affected both responsiveness to UV‐containing white light and transactivation by CPRF1::VP16. The data suggest that a CPRF1‐containing bZIP heterodimer interacts with ACECHSin vivo. We discuss regulatory steps in light‐induced CHS transcription that may be influenced by CPRF1 and/or related bZIP factors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Plant Journal Wiley

Transactivation properties of parsley proline‐rich bZIP transcription factors

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/transactivation-properties-of-parsley-proline-rich-bzip-transcription-pRVBOV5JRc
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0960-7412
eISSN
1365-313X
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-313x.2000.00687.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Light‐responsive chalcone synthase (CHS) gene activation requires LRUCHS, a light regulatory promoter unit including the MYB recognition element MRECHS and the ACGT‐containing element ACECHS. ACECHS is bound by the parsley basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) factors CPRF1 and 4. Factors containing the bZIP domain exist in animals, plants and yeast, and recognize DNA sequence‐specifically after formation of homo‐ or heterodimers. To determine the potential role of CPRFs in the regulation of CHS promoter activity, we investigated the functions of distinct CPRF domains in a homologous co‐transfection system. The proline‐rich domains of CPRF1 and CPRF4 activate transcription, indicating that CPRF1 and CPRF4 have transactivating properties. Over‐expression of the CPRF1 bZIP domain caused a reduction of LRUCHS‐mediated light inducibility, and point mutations throughout ACECHS affected both responsiveness to UV‐containing white light and transactivation by CPRF1::VP16. The data suggest that a CPRF1‐containing bZIP heterodimer interacts with ACECHSin vivo. We discuss regulatory steps in light‐induced CHS transcription that may be influenced by CPRF1 and/or related bZIP factors.

Journal

The Plant JournalWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2000

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off