Towards a hierarchical framework for modelling the spatial distribution of animals

Towards a hierarchical framework for modelling the spatial distribution of animals Aim A hierarchical framework is presented for modelling the spatial distribution of terrestrial vertebrate animals. Location The location of the study is the montane ash forests of the Central Highlands of Victoria, south‐eastern Australia. Methods The framework is illustrated using as a case study the distribution of Leadbeater’s Possum (Gymnobelideus leadbeateri McCoy, 1867, (Marsupialia: Petauridae)), a small arboreal marsupial. The framework is based upon quantifying the environmental response of a species in terms of a five‐level environmental hierarchy defined by scales (global‐, meso‐, topo‐, micro‐ and nano‐scales) that represent natural breaks in the distribution and availability of the primary environmental resources. Animal response is examined in terms of a species’ distribution as observed in four biological units (the species in toto, meta‐population/population, group/colony, and individual organism). We define the spatial occurrence and abundance of the target species in each of these units as its ‘distributional behaviour’. Results Predictions of the potential spatial distribution of Leadbeater’s Possum are presented at meso‐, topo‐, micro‐ and nano‐scales. These spatial predictions utilize Geographical Information System (GIS)‐based spatial models of long term mean monthly climate and terrain‐modified surface radiation, together with vegetation cover and individual tree attributes from air‐photo interpretation and field survey. Main conclusions Ideally, species’ responses at each level in the environmental hierarchy should be empirically derived using statistical models based on field observation of a species’ distribution and abundance. Spatial modelling of species’ responses becomes problematic at finer scales because of the lack of suitable environmental data. The key characteristics of the modelling framework are generic, but the influence of additional scales and processes will be important in other ecosystems and species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Biogeography Wiley

Towards a hierarchical framework for modelling the spatial distribution of animals

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/towards-a-hierarchical-framework-for-modelling-the-spatial-Wqkdxlw0Am
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0305-0270
eISSN
1365-2699
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2699.2001.00626.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aim A hierarchical framework is presented for modelling the spatial distribution of terrestrial vertebrate animals. Location The location of the study is the montane ash forests of the Central Highlands of Victoria, south‐eastern Australia. Methods The framework is illustrated using as a case study the distribution of Leadbeater’s Possum (Gymnobelideus leadbeateri McCoy, 1867, (Marsupialia: Petauridae)), a small arboreal marsupial. The framework is based upon quantifying the environmental response of a species in terms of a five‐level environmental hierarchy defined by scales (global‐, meso‐, topo‐, micro‐ and nano‐scales) that represent natural breaks in the distribution and availability of the primary environmental resources. Animal response is examined in terms of a species’ distribution as observed in four biological units (the species in toto, meta‐population/population, group/colony, and individual organism). We define the spatial occurrence and abundance of the target species in each of these units as its ‘distributional behaviour’. Results Predictions of the potential spatial distribution of Leadbeater’s Possum are presented at meso‐, topo‐, micro‐ and nano‐scales. These spatial predictions utilize Geographical Information System (GIS)‐based spatial models of long term mean monthly climate and terrain‐modified surface radiation, together with vegetation cover and individual tree attributes from air‐photo interpretation and field survey. Main conclusions Ideally, species’ responses at each level in the environmental hierarchy should be empirically derived using statistical models based on field observation of a species’ distribution and abundance. Spatial modelling of species’ responses becomes problematic at finer scales because of the lack of suitable environmental data. The key characteristics of the modelling framework are generic, but the influence of additional scales and processes will be important in other ecosystems and species.

Journal

Journal of BiogeographyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2001

References

  • Precipitation recycling in the Amazon Basin
    Eltahir, Eltahir; Bras, Bras
  • TAPES‐G: a grid‐based terrain analysis program for the environmental sciences
    Gallant, Gallant; Wilson, Wilson
  • Spatial autocorrelation in California land birds
    Koenig, Koenig
  • Ecological principles for the design of wildlife corridors
    Lindenmayer, Lindenmayer; Nix, Nix
  • Factors affecting stand structure in forests – are there climatic and topographic determinants ?
    Lindenmayer, Lindenmayer; Mackey, Mackey; Mullins, Mullins; McCarthy, McCarthy; Gill, Gill; Cunningham, Cunningham; Donnelly, Donnelly
  • A comparison of two statistical methods for spatial interpolation of Canadian monthly mean climate data
    Price, Price; Mckenney, Mckenney; Nalder, Nalder; Hutchinson, Hutchinson; Kesteven, Kesteven
  • EROS: a grid‐based program for estimating spatially distributed erosion indices
    Wilson, Wilson; Gallant, Gallant

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off