Topographic Partition of Watersheds with Digital Elevation Models

Topographic Partition of Watersheds with Digital Elevation Models Digital elevation models are used to automatically map the stream channel and divide networks of a watershed. These topographic skeletons are used to partition the watershed into a set of fundamental, runoff producing subregions, each of which drains into one stream link. Construction of a code describing the network topology, along with parallel files containing attribute information of each drainage area and associated stream link may form the basis for an efficient watershed information system. Registration of remotely sensed imagery and maps of important soils information to the digital elevation model allows an effective organization of this data as input to hydrologic simulation models. The methodology described here is designed to aid in the efficient parameterization of a distributed components approach to watershed simulation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Topographic Partition of Watersheds with Digital Elevation Models

Water Resources Research, Volume 22 (1) – Jan 1, 1986

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
D.O.I.
10.1029/WR022i001p00015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Digital elevation models are used to automatically map the stream channel and divide networks of a watershed. These topographic skeletons are used to partition the watershed into a set of fundamental, runoff producing subregions, each of which drains into one stream link. Construction of a code describing the network topology, along with parallel files containing attribute information of each drainage area and associated stream link may form the basis for an efficient watershed information system. Registration of remotely sensed imagery and maps of important soils information to the digital elevation model allows an effective organization of this data as input to hydrologic simulation models. The methodology described here is designed to aid in the efficient parameterization of a distributed components approach to watershed simulation.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1986

References

  • Thinning algorithms for grayscale pictures
    Dyer, C. R.; Rosenfeld, A.
  • Computer simulation in geology
    Harbaugh, J.; Bonham‐Carter, G.
  • The extraction of drainage networks from digital elevation data
    O'Callaghan, J. F.; Mark, D. M.
  • A Monte‐Carlo analysis of the hydrologic response
    Rodriguez‐Iturbe, I.; Valdes, J. B.

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