Tools of the trade: Improving nurses’ ability to access and evaluate research

Tools of the trade: Improving nurses’ ability to access and evaluate research INTRODUCTIONNurses are the single largest group of health providers, and require large amounts of information to provide appropriate care. Information needs centre around drugs, diseases and diagnostic information for nursing assessments, interventions, care planning and teaching (McKnight & Peet, ; Mi, ). On average, one question for every two patients arises throughout any given workday (Del Fiol, Workman, & Gorman, ). As front‐line providers of care, nurses have a professional obligation to use standards of care that demonstrate evidence of effectiveness. Therefore, nurses’ information‐seeking abilities are critical for acquiring evidence‐based answers to aid clinical decision‐making. The primary aim of this study was to determine if an information seeking (IS) competency improves nurses’ (1) knowledge/ability, and (2) frequency of using library resources and appraising evidence. A secondary aim was to examine the effects of nurse characteristics (education, years of experience and professional certification) on nurses’ IS knowledge/ability and usage.BACKGROUNDEvidence‐based practice (EBP) is well known to improve quality, lower costs and improve outcomes in health care (Institute of Medicine (IOM), ). The literature on EBP is extensive, and generally considers EBP to include these five A’s:Ask (a clinical question),Acquire (do literature searches for evidence),Appraise (evaluate research articles),Apply (integrate evidence into practice), http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Nursing Management Wiley

Tools of the trade: Improving nurses’ ability to access and evaluate research

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0966-0429
eISSN
1365-2834
D.O.I.
10.1111/jonm.12529
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONNurses are the single largest group of health providers, and require large amounts of information to provide appropriate care. Information needs centre around drugs, diseases and diagnostic information for nursing assessments, interventions, care planning and teaching (McKnight & Peet, ; Mi, ). On average, one question for every two patients arises throughout any given workday (Del Fiol, Workman, & Gorman, ). As front‐line providers of care, nurses have a professional obligation to use standards of care that demonstrate evidence of effectiveness. Therefore, nurses’ information‐seeking abilities are critical for acquiring evidence‐based answers to aid clinical decision‐making. The primary aim of this study was to determine if an information seeking (IS) competency improves nurses’ (1) knowledge/ability, and (2) frequency of using library resources and appraising evidence. A secondary aim was to examine the effects of nurse characteristics (education, years of experience and professional certification) on nurses’ IS knowledge/ability and usage.BACKGROUNDEvidence‐based practice (EBP) is well known to improve quality, lower costs and improve outcomes in health care (Institute of Medicine (IOM), ). The literature on EBP is extensive, and generally considers EBP to include these five A’s:Ask (a clinical question),Acquire (do literature searches for evidence),Appraise (evaluate research articles),Apply (integrate evidence into practice),

Journal

Journal of Nursing ManagementWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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