Tissue distribution of adenosine receptor mRNAs in the rat

Tissue distribution of adenosine receptor mRNAs in the rat 1 A degree of ambiguity and uncertainty exists concerning the distribution of mRNAs encoding the four cloned adenosine receptors. In order to consolidate and extend current understanding in this area, the expression of the adenosine receptors has been examined in the rat by use of in situ hybridisation and the reverse transcription‐polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR). 2 In accordance with earlier studies, in situ hybridisation revealed that the adenosine A1 receptor was widely expressed in the brain, whereas A2A receptor mRNA was restricted to the striatum, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle. In addition, A1 receptor mRNA was detected in large striatal cholinergic interneurones, 26% of these neurones were also found to express the A2A receptor gene. Central levels of mRNAs encoding adenosine A2B and A3 receptors were, however, below the detection limits of in situ hybridisation. 3 The more sensitive technique of RT‐PCR was then employed to investigate the distribution of adenosine receptor mRNAs in the central nervous system (CNS) and a wide range of peripheral tissues. As a result, many novel sites of adenosine receptor gene expression were identified. A1 receptor expression has now been found in the heart, aorta, liver, kidney, eye and bladder. These observations are largely consistent with previous functional data. A2A receptor mRNA was detected in all brain regions tested, demonstrating that expression of this receptor is not restricted to the basal ganglia. In the periphery A2A receptor mRNA was also found to be more widely distributed than generally recognised. The ubiquitous distribution of the A2B receptor is shown for the first time, A2B mRNA was detected at various levels in all rat tissues studied. Expression of the gene encoding the adenosine A3 receptor was also found to be widespread in the rat, message detected throughout the CNS and in many peripheral tissues. This pattern of expression is similar to that observed in man and sheep, which had previously been perceived to possess distinct patterns of A3 receptor gene expression in comparison to the rat. 4 In summary, this work has comprehensively studied the expression of all the cloned adenosine receptors in the rat, and in so doing, resolves some of the uncertainty over where these receptors might act to control physiological processes mediated by adenosine. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Pharmacology Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1996 British Pharmacological Society
ISSN
0007-1188
eISSN
1476-5381
DOI
10.1111/j.1476-5381.1996.tb15561.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 A degree of ambiguity and uncertainty exists concerning the distribution of mRNAs encoding the four cloned adenosine receptors. In order to consolidate and extend current understanding in this area, the expression of the adenosine receptors has been examined in the rat by use of in situ hybridisation and the reverse transcription‐polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR). 2 In accordance with earlier studies, in situ hybridisation revealed that the adenosine A1 receptor was widely expressed in the brain, whereas A2A receptor mRNA was restricted to the striatum, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle. In addition, A1 receptor mRNA was detected in large striatal cholinergic interneurones, 26% of these neurones were also found to express the A2A receptor gene. Central levels of mRNAs encoding adenosine A2B and A3 receptors were, however, below the detection limits of in situ hybridisation. 3 The more sensitive technique of RT‐PCR was then employed to investigate the distribution of adenosine receptor mRNAs in the central nervous system (CNS) and a wide range of peripheral tissues. As a result, many novel sites of adenosine receptor gene expression were identified. A1 receptor expression has now been found in the heart, aorta, liver, kidney, eye and bladder. These observations are largely consistent with previous functional data. A2A receptor mRNA was detected in all brain regions tested, demonstrating that expression of this receptor is not restricted to the basal ganglia. In the periphery A2A receptor mRNA was also found to be more widely distributed than generally recognised. The ubiquitous distribution of the A2B receptor is shown for the first time, A2B mRNA was detected at various levels in all rat tissues studied. Expression of the gene encoding the adenosine A3 receptor was also found to be widespread in the rat, message detected throughout the CNS and in many peripheral tissues. This pattern of expression is similar to that observed in man and sheep, which had previously been perceived to possess distinct patterns of A3 receptor gene expression in comparison to the rat. 4 In summary, this work has comprehensively studied the expression of all the cloned adenosine receptors in the rat, and in so doing, resolves some of the uncertainty over where these receptors might act to control physiological processes mediated by adenosine.

Journal

British Journal of PharmacologyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1996

References

  • Discrete distributions of adenosine receptors in mammalian retina
    BLAZYNSKI, BLAZYNSKI
  • Both A 1 and A 2a purine receptors regulate striatal acetylcholine release
    BROWN, BROWN; JAMES, JAMES; REDDINGTON, REDDINGTON; RICHARDSON, RICHARDSON
  • Nucleoside‐induced arteriolar constriction‐a mast cell‐dependent response
    DOYLE, DOYLE; LINDEN, LINDEN; DULING, DULING
  • Adenosine A 3 receptors mediate hypotension in the angiotensin II supported circulation of the pithed rat
    FOZARD, FOZARD; CARRUTHERS, CARRUTHERS
  • Contraction of the rat isolated spleen mediated by adenosine A 1 receptor activation
    FOZARD, FOZARD; MILAVEC‐KRIZMAN, MILAVEC‐KRIZMAN
  • Functional characterization of the adenosine receptor mediating inhibition of peristalsis in the rat jejunum
    HANCOCK, HANCOCK; COUPAR, COUPAR
  • Adenosine receptor mediated modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal synaptosomes
    KIRKPATRICK, KIRKPATRICK; RICHARDSON, RICHARDSON
  • Inhibition by KF17837 of adenosine A 2A receptor mediated modulation of striatal GABA and ACh release
    KUROKAWA, KUROKAWA; KIRK, KIRK; KIRKPATRICK, KIRKPATRICK; KASE, KASE; RICHARDSON, RICHARDSON

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