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Three‐dimensional Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Edited by K. Baba and D. Jurkovic, Published by Parthenon Publishing, Carnforth, UK, 1997, 110pp. ISBN 1‐85070‐619‐0

Three‐dimensional Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Edited by K. Baba and D. Jurkovic,... Three-dimensional Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology Edited by K. Baba and D. Jurkovic Published by Parthenon Publishing, Carnforth, UK, 1997 110pp. £48 ISBN 1-85070-619-0 It was a pleasure to read and review the first book in print presenting this new, exciting technology: three-dimensional ultrasound. This book presents material which involves the field of obstetrics and gynecology. It is a great place for the interested radiologist, obstetrician/gynecologist, sonographer or commercial vendor to begin their quest for knowledge in this area. The book coves the physics and methodology of the technique (Chapters 1 and 2) and the clinical applications to date (Chapters 3–10). Chapters 1 and 2 present the basics of volume acquisition, analysis and display. Many terms are introduced that will be familiar to imagers who have used three-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging but may be unfamiliar to sonologists/sonographers. It is a good place to start in understanding three-dimensional ultrasound. Chapters 3 and 4 both deal with the advantages of using three-dimensional ultrasound in evaluating fetuses with anomalies. This is clearly a very important clinical area for three-dimensional imaging to make contributions. E. Merz has extensive experience in the area and he reviews his observations from studying over 200 malformed fetuses with three-dimensional ultrasound. The chapter by K. Baba and T. Okai is valuable not only in reviewing studies performed to date, but also in suggesting areas in which threedimensional imaging has potential (e.g. in evaluating fetal bladder volume and renal function). Chapter 5 concerning fetal cardiac imaging is encouraging. The authors present information regarding non-gated three-dimensional cardiac images suggesting that this technology will assist in our understanding of the fetal heart, both normal and abnormal. I would suggest that gated three-dimensional technology will assist greatly in this evaluation, a point not discussed in this chapter but touched upon in Chapters 3 and 6. Chapter 6 suggests that three-dimensional ultrasound will be used to measure volumes more accurately, particu- larly with automated measurements. This is encouraging to the casual user, particularly if we are able to measure amniotic fluid volumes and fetal weights more accurately. This is something for the future as no papers are yet published on this. The authors importantly discuss errors related to calibration of three-dimensional images. Chapter 7 is rather fun. It deals with the psychological impact of three-dimensional imaging on the fetomaternal relationship. Although it may not seem very scientific, the message clearly stated was: For most women ‘. . . threedimensional) imaging provided a higher degree of security and increased their insight into the psychological aspects of their pregnancy’. Chapter 8 is great! If there is a niche that threedimensional ultrasound has found, I for one think it is in identifying congenital anomalies of the uterus. Currently, women undergo magnetic resonance imaging scans (after hysterosalpingography and conventional ultrasound) which are very costly, to determine what congenital anomalies are present; three-dimensional ultrasound can identify these anomalies quickly and accurately. The authors also discuss volume estimation of the endometrium in assessing patients with postmenopausal bleeding for endometrial carcinoma; these data are extremely encouraging. Chapters 9 and 10 are both filled with specific clinical applications of three-dimensional ultrasound in the fields of infertility (e.g. follicular volume estimation, guided follicular aspiration, fibroid location) and urogynecology (urethral sphincter and bladder neck evaluation in urinary stress incontinence). This is a rapidly developing field of technology and new data are being discovered daily. I recommend this book as a primer for those medical professionals and commercial vendors interested in three-dimensional ultrasound. D. H. PRETORIUS AMA: First Proof http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology Wiley

Three‐dimensional Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Edited by K. Baba and D. Jurkovic, Published by Parthenon Publishing, Carnforth, UK, 1997, 110pp. ISBN 1‐85070‐619‐0

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology
ISSN
0960-7692
eISSN
1469-0705
DOI
10.1046/j.1469-0705.1998.11030228.x
Publisher site
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Abstract

Three-dimensional Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology Edited by K. Baba and D. Jurkovic Published by Parthenon Publishing, Carnforth, UK, 1997 110pp. £48 ISBN 1-85070-619-0 It was a pleasure to read and review the first book in print presenting this new, exciting technology: three-dimensional ultrasound. This book presents material which involves the field of obstetrics and gynecology. It is a great place for the interested radiologist, obstetrician/gynecologist, sonographer or commercial vendor to begin their quest for knowledge in this area. The book coves the physics and methodology of the technique (Chapters 1 and 2) and the clinical applications to date (Chapters 3–10). Chapters 1 and 2 present the basics of volume acquisition, analysis and display. Many terms are introduced that will be familiar to imagers who have used three-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging but may be unfamiliar to sonologists/sonographers. It is a good place to start in understanding three-dimensional ultrasound. Chapters 3 and 4 both deal with the advantages of using three-dimensional ultrasound in evaluating fetuses with anomalies. This is clearly a very important clinical area for three-dimensional imaging to make contributions. E. Merz has extensive experience in the area and he reviews his observations from studying over 200 malformed fetuses with three-dimensional ultrasound. The chapter by K. Baba and T. Okai is valuable not only in reviewing studies performed to date, but also in suggesting areas in which threedimensional imaging has potential (e.g. in evaluating fetal bladder volume and renal function). Chapter 5 concerning fetal cardiac imaging is encouraging. The authors present information regarding non-gated three-dimensional cardiac images suggesting that this technology will assist in our understanding of the fetal heart, both normal and abnormal. I would suggest that gated three-dimensional technology will assist greatly in this evaluation, a point not discussed in this chapter but touched upon in Chapters 3 and 6. Chapter 6 suggests that three-dimensional ultrasound will be used to measure volumes more accurately, particu- larly with automated measurements. This is encouraging to the casual user, particularly if we are able to measure amniotic fluid volumes and fetal weights more accurately. This is something for the future as no papers are yet published on this. The authors importantly discuss errors related to calibration of three-dimensional images. Chapter 7 is rather fun. It deals with the psychological impact of three-dimensional imaging on the fetomaternal relationship. Although it may not seem very scientific, the message clearly stated was: For most women ‘. . . threedimensional) imaging provided a higher degree of security and increased their insight into the psychological aspects of their pregnancy’. Chapter 8 is great! If there is a niche that threedimensional ultrasound has found, I for one think it is in identifying congenital anomalies of the uterus. Currently, women undergo magnetic resonance imaging scans (after hysterosalpingography and conventional ultrasound) which are very costly, to determine what congenital anomalies are present; three-dimensional ultrasound can identify these anomalies quickly and accurately. The authors also discuss volume estimation of the endometrium in assessing patients with postmenopausal bleeding for endometrial carcinoma; these data are extremely encouraging. Chapters 9 and 10 are both filled with specific clinical applications of three-dimensional ultrasound in the fields of infertility (e.g. follicular volume estimation, guided follicular aspiration, fibroid location) and urogynecology (urethral sphincter and bladder neck evaluation in urinary stress incontinence). This is a rapidly developing field of technology and new data are being discovered daily. I recommend this book as a primer for those medical professionals and commercial vendors interested in three-dimensional ultrasound. D. H. PRETORIUS AMA: First Proof

Journal

Ultrasound in Obstetrics & GynecologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1998

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