Thermal Degradation of Allicin in Garlic Extracts and Its Implication on the Inhibition of the in‐Vitro Growth of Helicobacter pylori

Thermal Degradation of Allicin in Garlic Extracts and Its Implication on the Inhibition of the... Allicin, the main active principle related to Allium sativum chemistry, is considered to be responsible for the bacteriostatic properties of garlic. The work described here has demonstrated the direct implication of the allicin present in solvent‐free garlic extracts obtained with ethanol (ethanolic garlic extract, EGE) and acetone (acetonic garlic extract, AGE) in the inhibition of the in‐vitro growth of Helicobacter pylori ( Hp), the bacterium responsible for serious gastric diseases such as ulcers and even gastric cancer. The evolution of allicin concentration as a function of time and temperature has been the subject of a kinetic study. The reaction order, activation energy, and preexponential factor (in accordance with Arrhenius theory) have been determined for the decomposition process of allicin in these organic media. First‐order decomposition, an activation energy of 97.4 kJ/mol, and an Arrhenius preexponential factor of 8.9 × 1010 s−1 have been determined for allicin in EGE. For allicin in AGE the kinetic order determined was 1.5, the activation energy 184.5 kJ/mol, and the preexponential factor 3.1 × 1024 s−1 (mg/L)(−0.5). The presence or absence of allicin in these garlic products was found to be crucial for the inhibition of the in‐vitro growth of Hp, as demonstrated by microbiological analysis for AGE. A relationship has been identified between the effectiveness and durability of the anti‐ Hp properties shown by AGE and the allicin content of these products. The bacteriostatic properties were active for up to 10 months if the samples were maintained at 6 °C. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biotechnology Progress Wiley

Thermal Degradation of Allicin in Garlic Extracts and Its Implication on the Inhibition of the in‐Vitro Growth of Helicobacter pylori

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/thermal-degradation-of-allicin-in-garlic-extracts-and-its-implication-wKjlIY5ddS
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
ISSN
8756-7938
eISSN
1520-6033
D.O.I.
10.1002/btpr.34135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Allicin, the main active principle related to Allium sativum chemistry, is considered to be responsible for the bacteriostatic properties of garlic. The work described here has demonstrated the direct implication of the allicin present in solvent‐free garlic extracts obtained with ethanol (ethanolic garlic extract, EGE) and acetone (acetonic garlic extract, AGE) in the inhibition of the in‐vitro growth of Helicobacter pylori ( Hp), the bacterium responsible for serious gastric diseases such as ulcers and even gastric cancer. The evolution of allicin concentration as a function of time and temperature has been the subject of a kinetic study. The reaction order, activation energy, and preexponential factor (in accordance with Arrhenius theory) have been determined for the decomposition process of allicin in these organic media. First‐order decomposition, an activation energy of 97.4 kJ/mol, and an Arrhenius preexponential factor of 8.9 × 1010 s−1 have been determined for allicin in EGE. For allicin in AGE the kinetic order determined was 1.5, the activation energy 184.5 kJ/mol, and the preexponential factor 3.1 × 1024 s−1 (mg/L)(−0.5). The presence or absence of allicin in these garlic products was found to be crucial for the inhibition of the in‐vitro growth of Hp, as demonstrated by microbiological analysis for AGE. A relationship has been identified between the effectiveness and durability of the anti‐ Hp properties shown by AGE and the allicin content of these products. The bacteriostatic properties were active for up to 10 months if the samples were maintained at 6 °C.

Journal

Biotechnology ProgressWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off