The World Economic System and International Migration in Less Developed Countries: An Ecological Approach 1

The World Economic System and International Migration in Less Developed Countries: An Ecological... A comprehensive review of world system and ecological theory suggests that social scientists have shown only a mild and peripheral interest in international migration.' Indeed, there seems to be an academic void, at least within the world system literature, with respect to theoretical formulation concerning international migration. The subject matter relating to the world economic system and the urban ecological system have not produced a coherent and comprehensive theory of international migration. This is not surprising because technological progress, human resources and physical capital are the principal initiators through trade which, in turn, affects the overall productivity of an economy. In this context, the size, composition and predisposition of people in developing countries to move seem to be a central feature of the world economic system and ecological dominance. Various study designs and statistical techniques have been employed to assess the determinants of migration. Some have employed logistic (Mullan, 1988) and other forms of regression to analyse movements between countries; others have relied on descriptive and qualitative analyses (Da Vanzo, 1978; Zolberg, 1989; Cooper, 1985). The multiequation approach (e.g., Joreskog and Sorbom, 1984; Sobel, 1988) which allows for the estimation of direct and indirect effects, enhances an understanding http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Migration Wiley

The World Economic System and International Migration in Less Developed Countries: An Ecological Approach 1

International Migration, Volume 33 (1) – Jan 1, 1995

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1995 IOM
ISSN
0020-7985
eISSN
1468-2435
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1468-2435.1995.tb00020.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A comprehensive review of world system and ecological theory suggests that social scientists have shown only a mild and peripheral interest in international migration.' Indeed, there seems to be an academic void, at least within the world system literature, with respect to theoretical formulation concerning international migration. The subject matter relating to the world economic system and the urban ecological system have not produced a coherent and comprehensive theory of international migration. This is not surprising because technological progress, human resources and physical capital are the principal initiators through trade which, in turn, affects the overall productivity of an economy. In this context, the size, composition and predisposition of people in developing countries to move seem to be a central feature of the world economic system and ecological dominance. Various study designs and statistical techniques have been employed to assess the determinants of migration. Some have employed logistic (Mullan, 1988) and other forms of regression to analyse movements between countries; others have relied on descriptive and qualitative analyses (Da Vanzo, 1978; Zolberg, 1989; Cooper, 1985). The multiequation approach (e.g., Joreskog and Sorbom, 1984; Sobel, 1988) which allows for the estimation of direct and indirect effects, enhances an understanding

Journal

International MigrationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References

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