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The Uncanny in the Digital Age

The Uncanny in the Digital Age International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Int. J. Appl. Psychoanal. Studies 13(4): 374–379 (2016) Published online 5 January 2016 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002/aps.1479 Contemporary Media Forum The digital age has brought to us a new kind of relationship: the human being and the humanoid machine. Researchers have discovered an interesting phenomenon that arises when a person encounters a robot, android, or other artificially intelligent being who in many ways comes very close to seeming human, but falls just short of the mark. It was first identified by the Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori (1970) and later called the uncanny valley by Jasia Reichardt (1978). Many of us might have experienced this phenomenon when watching animated movies. As long as the characters seem somewhat human but still artificial, we feel comfortable. But when such beings appear very real while deviating almost imperceptibly from a perfect human likeness, our comfort level suddenly drops into the uncanny valley. Something about the creature does not seem right. People feel revulsion or find the experience eerily disturbing. Similarly, unsophisticated robots in movies that act or look somewhat like a real person can be delightful companions, but when very human-like androids do the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1479
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Int. J. Appl. Psychoanal. Studies 13(4): 374–379 (2016) Published online 5 January 2016 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002/aps.1479 Contemporary Media Forum The digital age has brought to us a new kind of relationship: the human being and the humanoid machine. Researchers have discovered an interesting phenomenon that arises when a person encounters a robot, android, or other artificially intelligent being who in many ways comes very close to seeming human, but falls just short of the mark. It was first identified by the Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori (1970) and later called the uncanny valley by Jasia Reichardt (1978). Many of us might have experienced this phenomenon when watching animated movies. As long as the characters seem somewhat human but still artificial, we feel comfortable. But when such beings appear very real while deviating almost imperceptibly from a perfect human likeness, our comfort level suddenly drops into the uncanny valley. Something about the creature does not seem right. People feel revulsion or find the experience eerily disturbing. Similarly, unsophisticated robots in movies that act or look somewhat like a real person can be delightful companions, but when very human-like androids do the

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2016

References