The temporal properties of rod vision.

The temporal properties of rod vision. 1. Profiles which represent rod thresholds for flickering fields seen against backgrounds of various intensity have shapes which depend on flicker frequency. Low frequency profiles rise smoothly as background intensity is increased. High frequency profiles are only affected by bright backgrounds, which cause them to rise steeply. Intermediate frequency profiles contain two distinct branches which resemble separate increment threshold functions. 2. The high intensity branches of two‐branched threshold profiles cannot be attributed to cone intrusion. Instead, both branches of such profiles are mediated by visual mechanisms which have the spectral properties, the dark adaptation properties and the directional insensitivity of rod vision. Thus, the stimuli are detected by rods. 3. Plots of critical flicker frequency (c.f.f.) as a function of intensity contain two rising branches which are separated by a plateau (when modulation depth is large), or they form two enclosed lobes so that only intermediate frequencies, but neither high nor low ones, are seen (when modulation depth is small). C.f.f. is profoundly depressed by very bright light (above 100 scotopic trolands) which saturates rod vision. 4. In dim light rod modulation sensitivity functions resemble those of low‐pass filters, but in bright light they resemble those of band‐pass filters. 5. Several forms of rod mediated interference occur at moderate intensities, where rod vision's temporal properties ordinarily improve abruptly. With certain stimuli, rod signals conveying temporal information disrupt one another so completely that suprathreshold flicker cannot be seen within a ten‐fold intensity range. 6. Many of these observations can be explained by the hypothesis that rod vision comprises two temporal channels which have different properties. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physiology Wiley

The temporal properties of rod vision.

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 332 (1) – Nov 1, 1982

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-temporal-properties-of-rod-vision-NMAX0A0BB2
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2014 The Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3751
eISSN
1469-7793
D.O.I.
10.1113/jphysiol.1982.sp014406
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1. Profiles which represent rod thresholds for flickering fields seen against backgrounds of various intensity have shapes which depend on flicker frequency. Low frequency profiles rise smoothly as background intensity is increased. High frequency profiles are only affected by bright backgrounds, which cause them to rise steeply. Intermediate frequency profiles contain two distinct branches which resemble separate increment threshold functions. 2. The high intensity branches of two‐branched threshold profiles cannot be attributed to cone intrusion. Instead, both branches of such profiles are mediated by visual mechanisms which have the spectral properties, the dark adaptation properties and the directional insensitivity of rod vision. Thus, the stimuli are detected by rods. 3. Plots of critical flicker frequency (c.f.f.) as a function of intensity contain two rising branches which are separated by a plateau (when modulation depth is large), or they form two enclosed lobes so that only intermediate frequencies, but neither high nor low ones, are seen (when modulation depth is small). C.f.f. is profoundly depressed by very bright light (above 100 scotopic trolands) which saturates rod vision. 4. In dim light rod modulation sensitivity functions resemble those of low‐pass filters, but in bright light they resemble those of band‐pass filters. 5. Several forms of rod mediated interference occur at moderate intensities, where rod vision's temporal properties ordinarily improve abruptly. With certain stimuli, rod signals conveying temporal information disrupt one another so completely that suprathreshold flicker cannot be seen within a ten‐fold intensity range. 6. Many of these observations can be explained by the hypothesis that rod vision comprises two temporal channels which have different properties.

Journal

The Journal of PhysiologyWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1982

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off