The structure of terminal and instrumental values: Dimensions and clusters

The structure of terminal and instrumental values: Dimensions and clusters Students in two Australian tertiary institutions completed Form E of the Rokeach Value Survey. Multidimensional scaling and clustering were applied to the two sets of data so obtained. For each data set, ranks for the full set of 36 values, the set of 18 terminal values alone, and the set of 18 instrumental values alone, were intercorrelated and the rank‐order correlations taken as measures of proximity between values. Dimensions resulting from the multidimensional scaling analyses were found to be fairly readily interpretable and to be comparable in part with the results of an earlier analysis by Rokeach using factor analysis and scaling. Correspondence between solutions obtained from the two data sets was quite high. The clustering analysis revealed no extensive “clumping” of values or tight subgroupings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Psychology Wiley

The structure of terminal and instrumental values: Dimensions and clusters

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1975 Australian Psychological Society
ISSN
0004-9530
eISSN
1742-9536
DOI
10.1080/00049537508255247
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Students in two Australian tertiary institutions completed Form E of the Rokeach Value Survey. Multidimensional scaling and clustering were applied to the two sets of data so obtained. For each data set, ranks for the full set of 36 values, the set of 18 terminal values alone, and the set of 18 instrumental values alone, were intercorrelated and the rank‐order correlations taken as measures of proximity between values. Dimensions resulting from the multidimensional scaling analyses were found to be fairly readily interpretable and to be comparable in part with the results of an earlier analysis by Rokeach using factor analysis and scaling. Correspondence between solutions obtained from the two data sets was quite high. The clustering analysis revealed no extensive “clumping” of values or tight subgroupings.

Journal

Australian Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1975

References

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