The significance of cell death by apoptosis in hepatobiliary disease

The significance of cell death by apoptosis in hepatobiliary disease J. SEARLE,‘ B. V . HARMON,’ C. J. BISHOP’ AND J. F. R. KERR* Departments of Pathology, ‘Royal Brisbane Hospiral and Wniversity o Queensland Medical f School, and 3Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston, Australia Accepted for publication 22 September 1986 Key words: acidophilic body, apoptosis, cell death, Councilman body, hepatitis, piecemeal necrosis. INTRODUCTION Ever since the early classic descriptions of the pathology of viral hepatitis,’ the occurrence in the liver of acidophilic or Councilman-like bodies has been regarded as an histological hallmark of the disease. However, despite the distinctive morphology of these bodies, which prompted the coining of specific names, their basic nature has aroused surprisingly little interest amongst hepatologists; their presence has traditionally been assumed to indicate necrosis of individual parenchymal cells. In the review that follows it is apparent that the acidophilic body is a manifestation of apoptosis, a type of cell death that is fundamentally different from necrosis in rnorphology, biochemistry and mode of initiation. Its features suggest a process of active cellular self-destruction rather than degeneration. Its incidence indicates that it is involved in the normal regulation of tissue size as well as being triggered by certain pathological stimuli. Of particular relevance to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Wiley

The significance of cell death by apoptosis in hepatobiliary disease

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0815-9319
eISSN
1440-1746
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1440-1746.1987.tb00152.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J. SEARLE,‘ B. V . HARMON,’ C. J. BISHOP’ AND J. F. R. KERR* Departments of Pathology, ‘Royal Brisbane Hospiral and Wniversity o Queensland Medical f School, and 3Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston, Australia Accepted for publication 22 September 1986 Key words: acidophilic body, apoptosis, cell death, Councilman body, hepatitis, piecemeal necrosis. INTRODUCTION Ever since the early classic descriptions of the pathology of viral hepatitis,’ the occurrence in the liver of acidophilic or Councilman-like bodies has been regarded as an histological hallmark of the disease. However, despite the distinctive morphology of these bodies, which prompted the coining of specific names, their basic nature has aroused surprisingly little interest amongst hepatologists; their presence has traditionally been assumed to indicate necrosis of individual parenchymal cells. In the review that follows it is apparent that the acidophilic body is a manifestation of apoptosis, a type of cell death that is fundamentally different from necrosis in rnorphology, biochemistry and mode of initiation. Its features suggest a process of active cellular self-destruction rather than degeneration. Its incidence indicates that it is involved in the normal regulation of tissue size as well as being triggered by certain pathological stimuli. Of particular relevance to

Journal

Journal of Gastroenterology and HepatologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1987

References

  • Shrinkage necrosis: a distinct mode of cellular death
    Kerr, Kerr
  • A suggested explanation for the paradoxically slow growth rate of basal‐cell carcinomas that contain numerous mitotic figures
    Kerr, Kerr; Searle, Searle
  • Adrenocortical cell deletion: the role of ACTH
    Wyllie, Wyllie; Kerr, Kerr; Macaskill, Macaskill; Currie, Currie
  • Cell death in the normal neonatal rat adrenal cortex
    Wyllie, Wyllie; Kerr, Kerr; Currie, Currie
  • Cell death: the significance of apoptosis
    Wyllie, Wyllie; Kerr, Kerr; Currie, Currie
  • Differential radiation response amongst proliferating epithelial cells
    Potten, Potten; Al‐Barwari, Al‐Barwari; Searle, Searle
  • Chromatin cleavage in apoptosis: association with condensed chromatin morphology and dependence on macromolecular synthesis
    Wyllie, Wyllie; Morris, Morris; Smith, Smith; Dunlop, Dunlop
  • Morphometric study of the removal of phenobarbital‐induced membranes from hepatocytes after cessation of treatment
    Bolender, Bolender; Weibel, Weibel
  • Histologic observations in human hepatitis non A, non B
    Dienes, Dienes; Popper, Popper; Arnold, Arnold; Lobeck, Lobeck
  • Orthotopic liver transplantation: a pathological study of 63 serial liver biopsies from 17 patients with special reference to the diagnostic features and natural history of rejection
    Snover, Snover; Sibley, Sibley; Freese, Freese
  • Electron microscopy of rejected human liver allografts
    Fennell, Fennell; Vierling, Vierling
  • Serum enzyme pattern in acute liver disease: relation to type of cell death
    Colman, Colman; Merrett, Merrett; Dudley, Dudley

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