The Self‐Reference Effect on Perception: Undiminished in Adults with Autism and No Relation to Autism Traits

The Self‐Reference Effect on Perception: Undiminished in Adults with Autism and No Relation to... IntroductionDefinitions of self‐awareness are numerous, throughout the history of philosophy as well as psychology. One particularly important distinction between subjective and objective levels of self (the ‘I’ and ‘me’, respectively) was drawn by James []. On the one hand, the self is an existential entity that experiences (the “I”). It is the knower, the experiencer, and the agent of activity. On the other hand, the self can be both known and experienced (the “Me”). The self can be the object of thought.Regardless of the precise taxonomy of self that is employed, it is widely agreed that the self plays an important role in human cognition and perception, exerting influence across a range of domains and situations [see Sui & Humphreys, ]. One of the clearest empirical demonstrations of this influence is the so‐called “self‐reference effect” [Rogers, Kuiper, & Kirker, ], whereby information encoded in relation to the self has a mnemonic advantage over information encoded in other ways. This effect is apparent in a number of different paradigms and across different domains of processing. For example, in the domain of memory, when people are asked to make explicit yes/no judgments about whether personality trait adjectives (e.g., “loving”, “grumpy”, “emotional”) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Autism Research Wiley

The Self‐Reference Effect on Perception: Undiminished in Adults with Autism and No Relation to Autism Traits

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1939-3792
eISSN
1939-3806
D.O.I.
10.1002/aur.1891
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionDefinitions of self‐awareness are numerous, throughout the history of philosophy as well as psychology. One particularly important distinction between subjective and objective levels of self (the ‘I’ and ‘me’, respectively) was drawn by James []. On the one hand, the self is an existential entity that experiences (the “I”). It is the knower, the experiencer, and the agent of activity. On the other hand, the self can be both known and experienced (the “Me”). The self can be the object of thought.Regardless of the precise taxonomy of self that is employed, it is widely agreed that the self plays an important role in human cognition and perception, exerting influence across a range of domains and situations [see Sui & Humphreys, ]. One of the clearest empirical demonstrations of this influence is the so‐called “self‐reference effect” [Rogers, Kuiper, & Kirker, ], whereby information encoded in relation to the self has a mnemonic advantage over information encoded in other ways. This effect is apparent in a number of different paradigms and across different domains of processing. For example, in the domain of memory, when people are asked to make explicit yes/no judgments about whether personality trait adjectives (e.g., “loving”, “grumpy”, “emotional”)

Journal

Autism ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

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