THE SELF IN SELF‐CONSCIOUS EMOTIONS

THE SELF IN SELF‐CONSCIOUS EMOTIONS The title of the Monograph by Deborah Stipek, Susan Recchia, and Susan McClintic—Self-Evaluation in Young Children—challenges us in two ways; it forces us to consider the self in "self-evaluation," and it forces us to rethink our views about emotions. "Evaluation" implies elaborate cognitive activities in which two events, separated both in time and in place, are compared. Such cognitive processes might be studied using a variety of techniques, but two methods are represented most frequently in the literature. The most common and often preferred technique is to ask young children questions pertaining to their actions or feelings and to use their answers to infer states of mind or processes of thinking. There are many examples of tbe use of this method across a wide variety of problems, many of which were made popular by Piaget's structural analysis and questioning techniques as applied to children. While such techniques inform us, at the least, of what people think they mean or why tbey behave in particular ways, they contain inherent dangers. People's explanations of wby tbey do certain things or of what they are thinking or feeling may bear little relation to tbe actual reasons or underlying processes. This can http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0037-976X
eISSN
1540-5834
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1540-5834.1992.tb00297.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The title of the Monograph by Deborah Stipek, Susan Recchia, and Susan McClintic—Self-Evaluation in Young Children—challenges us in two ways; it forces us to consider the self in "self-evaluation," and it forces us to rethink our views about emotions. "Evaluation" implies elaborate cognitive activities in which two events, separated both in time and in place, are compared. Such cognitive processes might be studied using a variety of techniques, but two methods are represented most frequently in the literature. The most common and often preferred technique is to ask young children questions pertaining to their actions or feelings and to use their answers to infer states of mind or processes of thinking. There are many examples of tbe use of this method across a wide variety of problems, many of which were made popular by Piaget's structural analysis and questioning techniques as applied to children. While such techniques inform us, at the least, of what people think they mean or why tbey behave in particular ways, they contain inherent dangers. People's explanations of wby tbey do certain things or of what they are thinking or feeling may bear little relation to tbe actual reasons or underlying processes. This can

Journal

Monographs of the Society for Research in Child DevelopmentWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1992

References

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