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The role of sensation seeking and need for cognition on Web‐site evaluations: A resource‐matching perspective

The role of sensation seeking and need for cognition on Web‐site evaluations: A resource‐matching... The Internet theoretically enables marketers to personalize a Web site to an individual consumer. This article examines optimal Website design from the perspective of personality trait theory and resource‐matching theory. The influence of two traits relevant to Internet Web‐site processing—sensation seeking and need for cognition —were studied in the context of resource matching and different levels of Web‐site complexity. Data were collected at two points of time: personality‐trait data and a laboratory experiment using constructed Web sites. Results reveal that (a) subjects prefer Web sites of a medium level of complexity, rather than high or low complexity; (b) high sensation seekers prefer complex visual designs, and low sensation seekers simple visual designs, both in Web sites of medium complexity; and (c) high need‐for‐cognition subjects evaluated Web sites with high verbal and low visual complexity more favorably. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology & Marketing Wiley

The role of sensation seeking and need for cognition on Web‐site evaluations: A resource‐matching perspective

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0742-6046
eISSN
1520-6793
DOI
10.1002/mar.20050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Internet theoretically enables marketers to personalize a Web site to an individual consumer. This article examines optimal Website design from the perspective of personality trait theory and resource‐matching theory. The influence of two traits relevant to Internet Web‐site processing—sensation seeking and need for cognition —were studied in the context of resource matching and different levels of Web‐site complexity. Data were collected at two points of time: personality‐trait data and a laboratory experiment using constructed Web sites. Results reveal that (a) subjects prefer Web sites of a medium level of complexity, rather than high or low complexity; (b) high sensation seekers prefer complex visual designs, and low sensation seekers simple visual designs, both in Web sites of medium complexity; and (c) high need‐for‐cognition subjects evaluated Web sites with high verbal and low visual complexity more favorably. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Journal

Psychology & MarketingWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2005

References