The role of maintenance respiration in plant growth

The role of maintenance respiration in plant growth Abstract Plant growth is the balance of photosynthetic gains and respiratory losses, and it is therefore essential to consider respiration in analyses of plant productivity. The partitioning of dark respiratory losses into two functional components, a growth component and a maintenance component, has proved useful. The growth loss is that associated with synthesis of new biomass while the maintenance loss is that associated with maintenance of existing biomass. Experimental evidence indicates that the respiratory cost of maintenance in herbaceous plants is about equal to the cost of growth over a growing season, with daily maintenace expenditures less important in the small, rapidly growing plant but increasing in significance as plant size increases and the relative growth rate decreases. Because it is such a large fraction of the total carbon budget of a plant, any variations in maintenance requirements may result in significant alterations in productivity. In the present work the theoretical and empirical bases of maintenance respiration are described: magnitudes of maintenance expenditures are summarized; and applications to models of plant growth and productivity are discussed. It is concluded that the costs of maintenance should be included in analyses of plant growth. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

The role of maintenance respiration in plant growth

Plant Cell & Environment, Volume 7 (8) – Nov 1, 1984

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
DOI
10.1111/1365-3040.ep11591833
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Plant growth is the balance of photosynthetic gains and respiratory losses, and it is therefore essential to consider respiration in analyses of plant productivity. The partitioning of dark respiratory losses into two functional components, a growth component and a maintenance component, has proved useful. The growth loss is that associated with synthesis of new biomass while the maintenance loss is that associated with maintenance of existing biomass. Experimental evidence indicates that the respiratory cost of maintenance in herbaceous plants is about equal to the cost of growth over a growing season, with daily maintenace expenditures less important in the small, rapidly growing plant but increasing in significance as plant size increases and the relative growth rate decreases. Because it is such a large fraction of the total carbon budget of a plant, any variations in maintenance requirements may result in significant alterations in productivity. In the present work the theoretical and empirical bases of maintenance respiration are described: magnitudes of maintenance expenditures are summarized; and applications to models of plant growth and productivity are discussed. It is concluded that the costs of maintenance should be included in analyses of plant growth.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1984

References

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