THE ROLE OF GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF CEREBRAL TUMOURS

THE ROLE OF GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF CEREBRAL TUMOURS Pilkington G.L. & Lantos P.L. (1982) Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology 8, 227–236 The role of glutamine synthetase in the diagnosis of cerebral tumours Glutamine synthetase (GS) was studied in a range of human brain tumours and compared with results obtained by staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) using the indirect immunoperoxidase and peroxidase‐anti‐peroxidase methods. All astrocytomas showed positive staining with GS, the degree of which was related to the extent of differentiation and the amount of cytoplasm of the constituent cells. Ependymomas were only weakly positive, although a dense GFAP reaction was detected around blood vessels; possibly due to the presence of astrocyte foot processes. Medulloblastomas showed signs of astrocytic differentiation by the presence of clusters of positively staining cells amongst undifferentiated neoplastic cells. Oligodendrocytomas and meningiomas were generally negative apart from occasional astrocytes within the former neoplasms. GS and GFAP staining corresponded in virtually all cases; however, GS demonstrated poorly‐fibrillated cells better than GFAP, but did not show cell processes so clearly. Although GS appears to be cell‐specific in the central nervous system for normal, reactive and neoplastic astrocytes, it is not organ‐specific and therefore also stains cells of other tissues, e.g. liver. GS offers a practical alternative to GFAP as an astrocyte specific marker in human cerebral tumours and may be of diagnostic value in cases where poorly‐differentiated astrocytic tumours have been found negative to conventional histological stains for glial fibres or demonstrate a weak positive reaction to GFAP. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuropathology & Applied Neurobiology Wiley

THE ROLE OF GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF CEREBRAL TUMOURS

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-role-of-glutamine-synthetase-in-the-diagnosis-of-cerebral-tumours-wU3n0AhEut
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0305-1846
eISSN
1365-2990
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2990.1982.tb00277.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pilkington G.L. & Lantos P.L. (1982) Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology 8, 227–236 The role of glutamine synthetase in the diagnosis of cerebral tumours Glutamine synthetase (GS) was studied in a range of human brain tumours and compared with results obtained by staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) using the indirect immunoperoxidase and peroxidase‐anti‐peroxidase methods. All astrocytomas showed positive staining with GS, the degree of which was related to the extent of differentiation and the amount of cytoplasm of the constituent cells. Ependymomas were only weakly positive, although a dense GFAP reaction was detected around blood vessels; possibly due to the presence of astrocyte foot processes. Medulloblastomas showed signs of astrocytic differentiation by the presence of clusters of positively staining cells amongst undifferentiated neoplastic cells. Oligodendrocytomas and meningiomas were generally negative apart from occasional astrocytes within the former neoplasms. GS and GFAP staining corresponded in virtually all cases; however, GS demonstrated poorly‐fibrillated cells better than GFAP, but did not show cell processes so clearly. Although GS appears to be cell‐specific in the central nervous system for normal, reactive and neoplastic astrocytes, it is not organ‐specific and therefore also stains cells of other tissues, e.g. liver. GS offers a practical alternative to GFAP as an astrocyte specific marker in human cerebral tumours and may be of diagnostic value in cases where poorly‐differentiated astrocytic tumours have been found negative to conventional histological stains for glial fibres or demonstrate a weak positive reaction to GFAP.

Journal

Neuropathology & Applied NeurobiologyWiley

Published: May 1, 1982

References

  • The excitation and depression of spinal neurones by structurally related amino acids
    CURTIS, CURTIS; WATKINS, WATKINS
  • Uptake and metabolism of glutamate in astrocytes cultured from dissociated mouse brain hemispheres
    SCHOUSBOE, SCHOUSBOE; SVENNEBY, SVENNEBY; HERTZ, HERTZ

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off