The role of Arabidopsis thaliana RASD1 gene in ABA‐dependent abiotic stress response

The role of Arabidopsis thaliana RASD1 gene in ABA‐dependent abiotic stress response Abiotic stress is one of the key parameters affecting plant productivity. Drought and soil salinity, in particular, challenge plants to activate various response mechanisms to withstand these adverse growth conditions. While the molecular events that take place are complex and to a large extent unclear, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is considered a major player in mediating the adaptation of plants to stress. Here we report the identification of an ABA‐insensitive mutant from Arabidopsis thaliana. A combination of molecular, genetic and physiology approaches were implemented, to characterise the AtRASD1 locus (RESPONSIVENESS TO ABA SALT AND DROUGHT 1) and to investigate its role in plant development. RASD1 is expressed predominantly in the vascular system of A. thaliana and encodes a peptide of unknown function with no similarity to any known sequence to date. The protein is localised in the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and RASD1‐impaired plants are drought‐intolerant and insensitive to exogenous ABA and NaCl during germination and root growth. Our data indicate that RASD1 is involved in ABA‐dependent signal transduction pathways and therefore in enabling plants to activate response mechanisms related to seed germination and abiotic stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Biology Wiley

The role of Arabidopsis thaliana RASD1 gene in ABA‐dependent abiotic stress response

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 German Botanical Society and Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands
ISSN
1435-8603
eISSN
1438-8677
D.O.I.
10.1111/plb.12662
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abiotic stress is one of the key parameters affecting plant productivity. Drought and soil salinity, in particular, challenge plants to activate various response mechanisms to withstand these adverse growth conditions. While the molecular events that take place are complex and to a large extent unclear, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is considered a major player in mediating the adaptation of plants to stress. Here we report the identification of an ABA‐insensitive mutant from Arabidopsis thaliana. A combination of molecular, genetic and physiology approaches were implemented, to characterise the AtRASD1 locus (RESPONSIVENESS TO ABA SALT AND DROUGHT 1) and to investigate its role in plant development. RASD1 is expressed predominantly in the vascular system of A. thaliana and encodes a peptide of unknown function with no similarity to any known sequence to date. The protein is localised in the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and RASD1‐impaired plants are drought‐intolerant and insensitive to exogenous ABA and NaCl during germination and root growth. Our data indicate that RASD1 is involved in ABA‐dependent signal transduction pathways and therefore in enabling plants to activate response mechanisms related to seed germination and abiotic stress.

Journal

Plant BiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

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