The Response of Water Temperatures to Meteorological Conditions

The Response of Water Temperatures to Meteorological Conditions The exchange of heat across the air‐water interface is one of the more important factors that govern the temperature of a water body. The net rate of heat exchange at the water surface is the sum of the rates at which heat is transferred by radiative processes, by evaporation, and by conduction between water and overlying air. The net rate can be evaluated in terms of a thermal exchange coefficient and an equilibrium temperature, both of which depend on observable meteorological variables. Any one of the many evaporation formulas and mathematical descriptions of the other heat exchange processes may be used to develop equations involving the thermal exchange coefficient and equilibrium temperature. Such equations are useful in developing relations that describe the temporal and spatial temperature distributions within a water body. They provide additional insight into the effects of meteorological conditions on water temperatures, and they facilitate estimates of various terms of the heat budget. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

The Response of Water Temperatures to Meteorological Conditions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/the-response-of-water-temperatures-to-meteorological-conditions-mQGJFvph5x
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1968 by the Chinese Geophysical Society
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
DOI
10.1029/WR004i005p01137
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The exchange of heat across the air‐water interface is one of the more important factors that govern the temperature of a water body. The net rate of heat exchange at the water surface is the sum of the rates at which heat is transferred by radiative processes, by evaporation, and by conduction between water and overlying air. The net rate can be evaluated in terms of a thermal exchange coefficient and an equilibrium temperature, both of which depend on observable meteorological variables. Any one of the many evaporation formulas and mathematical descriptions of the other heat exchange processes may be used to develop equations involving the thermal exchange coefficient and equilibrium temperature. Such equations are useful in developing relations that describe the temporal and spatial temperature distributions within a water body. They provide additional insight into the effects of meteorological conditions on water temperatures, and they facilitate estimates of various terms of the heat budget.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1968

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off